Can i overcome the crop factor issue somehow?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by sincere, Sep 7, 2007.

  1. sincere

    sincere TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2006
    Messages:
    475
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Berlin
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Somehow? With a 400D, a 50mm is like an 80mm and so on so that kinda sucks..been thinking about getting a Sigma 30mm 1.4(or would you recommend me something else?), wich i could use for a full sensor camera in the future but i dont really want to spend that kinda money right now.

    Isnt there something that can be done about this whole crop thing besides getting a full sensor cam?
     
  2. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 4, 2005
    Messages:
    2,484
    Likes Received:
    0
    IMO it's not really a problem to be overcome, it just takes some adapting to. You buy lenses to suit your needs; they're just different focal lengths from the ones you'd use for a 35mm frame.

    Correct me if I'm wrong, but it sounds like your problem is specifically with wanting a "50mm equivalent".

    If so, then the Sigma 30mm f/1.4 is apparently pretty good for that purpose... but you would not be able to use it on a full-frame 35mm dSLR. It's designed for the 'cropped' APS-C sensor size only.

    Personally if you want a "normal" prime, and one that will also work on "full-frame" cameras, I would look at a 35mm f/2. Admittedly it's not the fastest lens, and it will be more expensive than a cheap 50mm... but less expensive than the Sigma or Canon f/1.4. 35mm primes are like 50mm primes, they tend to be very good performers for the price, so I'm sure Canon's one is good.

    Another option would be the 28mm f/1.8... working out at "equivalent" to 44mm on a "full-frame" camera, this is probably closer to the theoretical "normal" focal length. However I would expect the 28mm to be less impressive optically, and not as good value for money, as the 35mm f/2 (but I could be wrong there).
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2003
    Messages:
    33,821
    Likes Received:
    1,811
    Location:
    Edmonton
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I agree with ZaphodB, it's not a problem...you just have to choose your lenses based on what they give you on your camera...not what they give you on a film or FF camera.

    I also find that 50mm is too long for many things, on my 'crop camera'. I have the Sigma 30mm F1.4 and it's a great lens. It won't give full coverage on a film or FF camera though...so if you do plan to switch your camera...it may not be a great idea. (although you could buy it now and sell it later).

    There are plenty of other options. 24mm, 28mm, 35mm etc. The Canon 24mm F1.4 L and the 35mm F1.4 L are both fantastic lenses...but they are also very expensive.
     
  4. gryphonslair99

    gryphonslair99 Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Sep 9, 2006
    Messages:
    11,441
    Likes Received:
    2,100
    Location:
    Wichita, Kansas, USA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Two large steps back or so?
     
  5. elsaspet

    elsaspet TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2004
    Messages:
    4,055
    Likes Received:
    37
    Location:
    Dallas
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Buy a sensor crop. I used one for a long time. It's pretty cheap too.
     
  6. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    14,491
    Likes Received:
    206
    Location:
    Europe 67.51°N
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I used the Canon EF 28mm f/1.8 along with an EF 50mm 1.4 for a while on full frame, and the performance was quite nice actually. The 28mm was not quite as sharp over the whole frame as the 50mm at f/1.8, but still quite good. On a crop sensor this problem should be even reduced.
     
  7. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    14,491
    Likes Received:
    206
    Location:
    Europe 67.51°N
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    does not work as this also changes perspective, doesn't it?
     
  8. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2003
    Messages:
    9,713
    Likes Received:
    203
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    AFAIK the perspective is a function of perceived angle of view and distance. So providing the framing is the same yes the perspective is changed. The only way to counter this is to get a 35mm lens.
     
  9. jstuedle

    jstuedle No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2005
    Messages:
    4,889
    Likes Received:
    14
    Location:
    S.E. Indiana
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    No more than a "normal" 80mm on a Hasselblad 6X6 or a 12mm on a 1/4" sensor P&S. It's all about using the lens for your needs. I have shot a 35mm f/2.0 Nikkor for 8 years on my DSLR's as a normal lens and not seen a problem. But technically, yes the perspective is different but not really an issue.
     
  10. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Aug 30, 2006
    Messages:
    14,491
    Likes Received:
    206
    Location:
    Europe 67.51°N
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    perspective is independed of the angle of view AFAIK.
    perspective has an influence on the ratio of how large things in the foreground appear with respect to things in the background. and that changes a lot when you move towards or away from the subject, but not when you increase or reduce your angle of view.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
crop sensor suck
,
crop sensor sucks
,

how to overcome crop factor

,
over come crop factor
,
overcome crop factor
,
overcome crop sensor
,
overcoming crop sensor