can someone put these two things into easy to understand?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by flyfisher117, Aug 5, 2010.

  1. flyfisher117

    flyfisher117 TPF Noob!

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    Macro and ISO what are they exactly? i googled them but got the biggest headache ever trying to understand them....

    can someone put them into terms a 16 year old can under stand?

    from what i can tell macro is for close up shots??

    but iso i have no clue
     
  2. Eventer

    Eventer TPF Noob!

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  3. PerfectlyFlawed

    PerfectlyFlawed TPF Noob!

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    Yes macro is close ups..like 1:1 ratio. super close... and detailed.
    ISO adjusts the cameras sensitivity to light, At a higher ISo you can use a faster shutter speed or a smaller aperture (higher f stop number) because less light is needed to expose the image.

    they recommend using a smaller ISO unless your in a dark situation... then youd have to bump it up and of course you'd get a noisy picture.

    hope that helps a little.
     
  4. LCARSx32

    LCARSx32 TPF Noob!

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    The higher the ISO, the less light you need to take a picture. But the higher it is, the noisier it is. Try to use as low of ISO as you can (unless you want a grainy shot for a grungy look).
     
  5. MrBarney

    MrBarney TPF Noob!

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    ISO. It's adjusting how sensitive to light the sensor is.

    Camera Exposure: Aperture, ISO & Shutter Speed

    Analogy: If you were dusting a cake with icing sugar, the ISO is the size of the mesh in the seive. Small holes mean you need to spend more time (longer shutter) or use a bigger seive (larger aperture) to cover the cake. A mesh of small holes will also get you a nice even coverage on the cake.

    Large holes (higher ISO) mean you can spend less time (faster shutter) or use a smaller seive (smaller aperture) but the result might be a little lumpy and uneven (noisy).

    If you hit the limit of aperture or acceptable shutter speed (you're using your largest seive, or need the accuracy a smaller seive provides, and are in a real hurry!) then you have to up the ISO.

    Makes sense to me anyway :lol:
     
  6. hallowdmachine

    hallowdmachine TPF Noob!

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  7. inTempus

    inTempus TPF Noob!

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    One minor technical point, the sensors sensitivity doesn't change as you change your ISO setting. Your sensor has the same sensitivity to light throughout its ISO range, the only thing that changes is how much processing the processor does.

    Your sensor has a base ISO sensitivity. For Canon that's ISO 100 and for most Nikons it's ISO 200. Anything above or below this base setting requires processing to achieve that particular ISO "sensitivity". That's why we get noise in our images as we increase the ISO (or in some cases decrease it too).
     
  8. Idahophoto

    Idahophoto TPF Noob!

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    ISO refurs to the film speed in classic term or how sensitive the film was to light. Fi excample ISO 50 film would need more light to get a proper exposure than 400. The 400 would be a better choice for say taking a shot of someone at night as it would require less time to expose. So why not just use the fastest ISO all the time couse it adds noise or grain the lower the ISO the better the image quality will be. Now days, you can shoot ISO 800 or even much higher and still have a excellent image so this is not as big of a issue as it once was but still does hold true. I always shoot on ISO 100 and would go lower if I could unless have specifically have a need to up the speed. Damn, I miss my kadachrome 64 and Fuji Velvia 50. Days long gone but not forgotten

    Think of Macro like magnify. A macro lens can focus much more closer giving you a bigger image than a non macro lens. Go to a camera store and ask for a 100mm Macro lens and toss a dime on the counter. Focus as close as you can. Compose and take a shot now do the same with a non macro 100mm and you will see a big difference. The dime shot with the macro will be larger.

    Hope this helps you
     
  9. Petraio Prime

    Petraio Prime TPF Noob!

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    ISO is the abbreviation for the International Standards Organization. They develop standards for industrial purposes.

    In relation to photography, ISO a numerical representation of the sensitivity of film to light. It is a linear arithmatic progression. An ISO 50 film requires half the exposure of an ISO 25 film; an ISO 100 film requires one-fourth, etc.

    More here:

    Film speed - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Digital cameras don't really have 'true' ISO speeds as such; they simply borrow the nomenclature because people are familiar with it. The sensors are programmed to have a certain sensitivity beyond their basic sensitivity.

    'Macro' simply means close-up photography, in the range of 1:1 ratio or greater.
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2010
  10. Gaerek

    Gaerek TPF Noob!

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    That's actually one of the best analogies I've seen for ISO. I'll use that from now on when I'm trying to teach/explain it to people.
     
  11. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    The image sensor in a digital camera is an analog device.

    Each pixel developes a voltage proportional to the number of photons (particles of light) that have struck the pixel. That voltage is quite small even if a lot of light struck the pixel.

    So the voltage needs to be amplified. There are amplifier circuits included on the image sensor chip and they are designed so that as the native ISO setting in the camera is increased, the amount the pixel voltage is amplified is also increased. That's what seems to make the image sensor more sensitive to light.

    The quality of the amplifier circuits has a lot to do with how much noise an image will have at higher ISO settings. More expensive cameras, tend to have higher quality amplifier circuits and less high ISO noise.

    The amplified voltage is then sent through an Analog-To-Digital converter. The output of the A-D converter is the digital ones and zeros the image processor can understand work with.

    Many cameras can allow for ISO settings outside their native ISO range. These are usually noted with special names like Hi 1, Hi 2, Lo 1, Lo 2, etc.

    These non-native ISO values are not handled in the amplifier circuits but are instead the result of software routines run in the image processor. The software usually renders images with less dynamic range than the native ISO values.
     
  12. bigtwinky

    bigtwinky No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Crap, now I want cake :drool:
     

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