Can wind damage lenses?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by keller, Feb 7, 2006.

  1. keller

    keller TPF Noob!

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    I've noticed that when taking photos on top of tall buildings, or near seaside cliffs, the wind tends to be very strong (enough to almost blow me over).

    What worried me was that the wind tends to blow quite hard on the lens. Can wind damage a camera lens? How do you guys take photos on windy days without scratching up the lens?
     
  2. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Wind does not scratch lenses. Sand and grit however may well, so beaches in a sand-storm are definitely to be avoided. The general answer to protecting your front element is to use a UV filter, and then put a plastic sandwich bag with a rubber band over the rest of the camera and the lens.

    If you're not happy, the camera won't be, so be careful, but strong winds on their own shouldn't do anything.

    Rob
     
  3. amoki

    amoki TPF Noob!

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    Oh no. Rob's wrong. Very wrong. Strong wind will cause friction between you lens and air, and as the friction increses the lens get hotter and hotter, eventually you're lens will disintegrate in a ball of fire like a doomed space shuttle, if it doesn't get on fire first. That's why I never shoot anything in windy conditions.

    I'll run away before anyone knocks me head. :lmao:

    (If you don't know it's a joke, it is. Put a UV filter on as good measure if you're scarred of your lens being damaged.)
     
  4. keller

    keller TPF Noob!

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    Well I usually take photos from the balconies of very tall hotels or buildings, so I guess my lens are safe (...I think). Still, I might find a cheap filter to protect my lens just in case there's grit or dirt in the air.

    Actually amoki, I thought you were serious, until you mentioned the fireball part. I'm pretty gullible :)
     
  5. Dweller

    Dweller Inconspicuous Supporter

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    I consider a UV filter a must for protecting any lens. From what I have some to understand the impact on image quality is so slight to be unnoticeable but the first time you drop your lens and break that filter instead of the front element of your lens you will be very grateful to have it.

    I try to be very careful with my stuff but accidents happen. Just ask my 28MM lens that went swimming a few months back.

    I am happy to report that its doing fine and has sworn off any aquatic activitys in the future.
     
  6. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    Your lens is more likely to be damaged by the vibrations of the drive to the shoot than anything that happens on one... Except children and ice cream cones. Oh yeah drunks fighting around your camera case. I did a lot of redneck weddings...
     
  7. keller

    keller TPF Noob!

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    How does the UV filter affect the photo? I might purchase one later this week, I've found some cheap new ones for $50 (AUD)
     
  8. Azuth

    Azuth TPF Noob!

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    Keller, in most aspects a UV filter will not have a big effect on the photo, but it is one more bit of glass for the light to go through.

    They can be a pain in some lighting conditions but you'll work those out quickly enough.

    I tend to keep mine on most lenses most of the time particularly using them outside.

    $50.00 AU is not cheap for a UV filter. $30.00 Would be the right price.
     
  9. cjoe

    cjoe TPF Noob!

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    I got a decent Hoya filter for 20 AUD off ebay.^^ The filter factor for UV is not an issue if you're metering TTL. The effect is often beneficial, it will help give you more saturated colours and let you 'see through' through haze.
     
  10. amoki

    amoki TPF Noob!

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    LOL, you can get a good one (Hoya, Tiffen, Marumi) in New Zealand for about 20 NZD, incld GST :) http://www.photo.co.nz/newprods/newhoya.htm

    Imagine how much it would be in Australia! $50 bucks is definitely overkill!
     
  11. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    The Uv filter is all the rage these days... When I first started 35 years ago the protection lens was a skylight 1a. Very slight pink tint excelent for taming kodak films.
     
  12. keller

    keller TPF Noob!

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    Is Hoya a good brand? I saw some Hoya filters at the store for $19. But I wasnt sure, if I buy a cheaper filter, will it make my photos look worse?
     

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