can you do those "clone pics" on film?

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by slickhare, Dec 7, 2005.

  1. slickhare

    slickhare TPF Noob!

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    they seem to be all the rage now and i was wondering if the technique is limited to digi-cams?
     
  2. stingray

    stingray TPF Noob!

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    multiple exposures... trick is to halve the iso (under expose a stop) per clone.. so if you're using 400 ISO film and want to take two clone shots expose twice at 200ISO. someone else'll be able to explain t beter and perhaps fill me in in more detail.. hope that's a start..
     
  3. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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  4. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    'Yes - sort of' is the short answer :hertz:
    It's tricky on 35mm because you have to tighten the rewind spool, press the rewind release and then wind on - and hope the film doesn't move.
    It's simple on 6x6 and upwards because you cock the shutter separately.
    Don't mess with the ISO.
    Use a tripod. Take a meter reading and divide it by the number of multiple exposures that you want. Then expose at the new reading for the required number of times.
    For example:
    4 exposures.
    Reading f4@1/60th
    Gives 4 exposures at f8@1/60th

    As long as you don't move the camera the scene will record normally so if you move something around in there you will get 'ghost' images of it.
    Another way is to do it in the dark, lock the shutter open and use flash. In this case you do not need to adjust exposure, just set the aperture for the flash guide.
     
  5. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Yeah but then you've got loads of ghosts, which isn't as cool as loads of solid people. Or shoes.

    I still think a man like you Hertz should be suggesting people try more arcane old-school techniques like negative splicing or bulb-flash or somesuch. :hertz:

    :)

    Rob
     
  6. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    Mattes inside the camera is the best way - but it only works with 5x4 and 10x8.
     
  7. TheCanonMan

    TheCanonMan TPF Noob!

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    I did some killer multiple exposures with my EOS-1 it's in the program of the camera to where you can get 1 to 9 multiple exposures to every one picture
     
  8. darin3200

    darin3200 TPF Noob!

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    Just a thought, how about taking a bunch of different underexposed shots and stacking the negs?
     
  9. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    The end result can look 'muddy' if the conditions aren't right and you stack more than 3 or 4.
    The old way was to do a photomontage with the neg. There were guys who could strip out the three layers of a colour film, montage various bits of neg or tranny together, retouch and the finished result would have fooled anyone. I worked on a car shot where we took five different shots in four different locations and the image was assembled in the lab. Even I had a hard time seeing the joins.
    But those guys got paid a heck of a lot more than the photographers did.
    The other way, as I have said, is to use mattes inside the camera.
     

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