Canon Rebel

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by JayJay65, Aug 25, 2007.

  1. JayJay65

    JayJay65 TPF Noob!

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    I was looking into a camera to buy.. I want my first DSLR.. I was looking into the Canon Rebel XTi amd XT..

    Canon Rebel XTi <- hyperlink

    Since this would be my first DSLR.. can I have some help with learning the new functions, and how the SLR's work.. Im used to my Kodak EasyShare Z612...

    To explain what I mean, heres some questions to start it off..

    - What should I look for in a [DSLR] camera??
    - I know DSLR means interchangable lenses, but what do the lenses control [features-wise]?

    THANK YOU ALOT!
    - Jess :lovey:
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    The lenses control the light...which is pretty important to Photography. (Photo = light) ;)
    The lens is essentially the most important part. When looking at lenses, you want to consider the focal length (listed in millimeters)...you might also call this the zoom of the lens.
    The next thing to consider with a lens is the aperture. That's the adjustable 'hole' in the lens, through which the light passes. The limiting factor will usually be the maximum aperture of a lens, and that is listed in the name of the lens. 50mm F1.8...is a lens with a focal length of 50mm and a maximum aperture of F1.8 (smaller F number means a larger aperture).

    Zoom lenses will often have a range of maximum aperture (it gets smaller when you zoom out). For example, 18-55 F3.5-5.6. Top quality lenses will have a max aperture that stays the same throughout the zoom range. 24-70 F2.8, for example.

    There is also the quality of a lens. Both the build quality and the optical or image quality that it produces. That is harder to determine, often you have to read reviews to see what other people think. An quick and easy way to tell, is usually the price. The more expensive a lens it, usually, the better quality it is. Most of Canon's top of the line lenses have an L in the name.

    So when looking at lenses, you want to consider the focal length or range that you want and the maximum aperture. A larger max aperture is almost alway better to have...but that makes the lens bigger, heavier and more expensive.
     
  3. chrisk121

    chrisk121 TPF Noob!

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    DSLR actually means Digital Single Lens Reflex. Single lens is saying that you look through the same lens that takes the picture. And reflex refers to the motion of the reflex mirror inside the camera body. The lenses control aperture, focal length and magnification.

    What should you look for? Well different DSLRs have their ups and downs. Canons entry level DSLRs have very good high ISO performance, many lenses and bodies to upgrade to and are pretty well priced. Some features to look at may be continuous shooting rate, The quality of the kit lens, and (though not important unless printing to VERY big sizes) Resolution. Many people will tell you to hold each camera (in a good camera shop that will let you) to decide what model feels the best.

    The cameras in that price range are:

    Canon- Rebel XT,Rebel XTi
    Nikon- D40, D40x
    Pentax- K100d
    Olympus- E-330, E-410
    Sony- Alpha A-100
     
  4. JayJay65

    JayJay65 TPF Noob!

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    What I want from a DSLR is very strong I need zoom.. my Kodak EasyShare Z612 has a lense that zooms 420mm.. with 6 MP.. I want something better zoom.. I checked the prices on a better lense for that zoom and they are over 1,000$.. thats definitly NOT acceptable for me lol.. Noise is always my biggest pain..

    Zoom + Less noise as possible + Resolution is what im looking for.. ill check out the models you listed chris
     
  5. soylentgreen

    soylentgreen TPF Noob!

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    Unfortunately, zoom = $$$$ in photography terms, especially where image quality is concerned. The noise you encounter is pretty much addressed by the contemporary dSLR's. Most nowadays have acceptable pixel-to- noise ratios's upto ISO 1600. The jump from the Kodak EasyShare Z612 to any dSLR is significant as far as image quality is concerned. You are moving from a small CCD sensor to a larger CMOS sensor that will greatly improve the quality of the pictures you take in terms of color accuracy, gamut and quality/ low-noise. P&S shoot in JPEG mode at 4-bits while the dSLR's in RAW mode can shoot upwards of 12-14-bits. As long as you have enough light you can shoot at a lower ISO, say between 100-400, to further reduce noise. As far as lenses, to start with you can get a prosumer zoom lens like the EF 70-300 f/4-5.6 IS along with the stock lens or something better. The EF 70-200 f/4 L offers much better image quality, but less zoom for about the same price as the 70-300. Both run at around $600. I reccommend IS for any shots you intend to shoot hand-held over 200mm. Unfortunately, I know of no lenses of 400mm under $1100 that I would reccommend.
     
  6. JayJay65

    JayJay65 TPF Noob!

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    It seems like to get a nice macro lense its 400$, or a good zooming lense its 1,000$+ and its just so expensive.. Why not just get an advanced camera that specializes for what you need??
     
  7. soylentgreen

    soylentgreen TPF Noob!

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    The appeal of SLRs are their versatility IMO. They are not pigeon hold into one specialized field. I could easily switch between macro and telephoto by just changing lenses. They are compact and easily, if not always convenient, to carry around. If I get a medium to large format camera, I would have a difficult time toting that around to parties, weddings, etc. But they offer excellent resolution and image quality for just about any shot over SLRs. Rangefinders are perfect for everyday shooting, but lack the longer zoom capability. Grant these other groups are fairly expensive to say the least. You do not have to spend $1000 to get a good zoom lens.
    Your main concern was resolution and noise. Any current DSLR will address your noise issue and anything over 8MP on at least a 1.6x CMOS crop-sensor will produce good resolution. Image quality is where the lens comes in. The lenses that offer the best image quality are at a premium. There are other vendors i.e. Sigma, Tamron, Tokina, that offer lenses priced less than Canon or Nikon branded lenses. Some are noteworthy, but just not quite up to par as their name-brand counterpart.
    What do you intend to shoot and what level of image quality do you require? Landscape, wildlife, macro? That will determine the zoom you actually need. I work at a zoo where I can actually get up and touch some of the animals, but being that close really requires a really wide-angle lens to capture the specimen. I got away with a EF 70-200 f/4 L for the longest time as long as I could get within 30 feet of the subject, I will just crop later to fix the composition. The stock EF-S 17-85 f/4-5.6 IS was my mainstay until recently. For macro work, the EF-S 60 f/2.8 or EF 100 f/2.8 are absolutley spectacular lenses. All for under the $600 range. If you want to see the eyelashes off of a fly at say 10 meters away, that is where the $1000+ lenses will come in. :)
     
  8. JayJay65

    JayJay65 TPF Noob!

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    I see.. Im looking into the Olympus Evolt E-410 DSLR...

    With 10.9 million pixels.. and maybe a Zuiko Digital ED 70-300mm F4.0-5.6, do you think I could (keeping in mind MP + crop) get a better "fake" zoom (large image + crop) with the Olympus then my 12x optical, 6MP camera?

    Also, with a lense for an SLR, does noise show less (or maybe near none) when you use a higher ISO.. or does it stay the same as with an advanced model camera?
     
  9. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    You wouldn't need a "fake" zoom; that lens on the Olympus is going to be noticeably longer than the long end of your zoom anyway. The lens on your current Kodak is roughly equivalent to a 420mm lens on a film SLR... whereas the 70-300 on the Olympus would be equivalent to a 600mm. And if you wanted to crop, yes it would most probably be better to crop from a dSLR image than an image from the Kodak.

    Of course, a 70-300mm is a long telephoto zoom... you would want to make sure that you get the 14-42mm kit lens with the camera as well, to cover wide-angle and normal lengths too.

    And yes, images from a dSLR will be less noisy at higher ISOs than compact cameras like the Kodak.
     
  10. soylentgreen

    soylentgreen TPF Noob!

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    With digital sensors, noise is a result of light photons not reflecting off the sensor pixel correctly or at all. CCD sensors on P&S are relatively small compared to the 35mm CMOS sensors; or larger, used on high-end cameras i.e. Canon 1D's, 5D, Nikon D3(finally) etc. The larger the pixel size on the sensor, the more light photons that can react with the sensor to make a digital signal, hence less noise and better ISO control. You will see a drastic improvement on the pixel-to-noise ratio when you decide to make the jump to DSLRs.

    Crop sensors are not going to give you more zoom. It just appears larger because the sensoor is cutting off about a third of the field of view when campared to a full-frame 35mm sensor/film. If you really want to "fake" zoom-in on a subject, just shoot in RAW mode, convert it at a high DPI, and crop to your hearts content in Photoshop. It helps if you use a really sharp lens. :)
     
  11. JayJay65

    JayJay65 TPF Noob!

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    So my Kodak EasyShare Z612's 12x optical zoom (35mm-420mm) is equal to about 420mm on a FILM SLR (film).. but the 70-300mm on the DSLR (olympus) is equal to a 600mm.. so the mm in an advanced model and a DSLR model arent the same??
     
  12. JayJay65

    JayJay65 TPF Noob!

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    Evolte E-410 Digital SLR:

    Sensor Size 17.3 mm (H) x 13.0 mm (V)


    Alpha DSLR-A100 10.2 DSLR:

    Image Sensor 23.6 x 15.8mm 10.8 Megapixel APC CCD Sensor with RGB primary color filter


    So what your saying is the Sony has a bigger sensor, so it will have less noise if (or even if i dont) add a zooming lense??
     

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