Canon SX1 IS? (CMOS in a Point-and-Shoot)

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by Hermie, Jul 1, 2009.

  1. Hermie

    Hermie TPF Noob!

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    Seeing is how I've landed enough money to start seriously browsing for a camera (though I'm torn between a camera and replacing my aging computer), I've been wondering what to get. If I go PC, I already have what I want picked out (an awesome Toshiba laptop!), but as for a camera, I'm still not sure.

    I have enough to go out and buy the Canon SX10. I was thinking of getting it because I was going to need the zoom for wildlife pictures, but now I'm thinking more about image quality and actually being able to sell my photos. Then, I read that the SX1 has a CMOS sensor, as opposed to a standard CCD. The SX1 also has 1080p HD movie shooting.

    BUT, I've been seeing mixed reviews. Professionals have been saying that the CMOS is not fitting of the title in the point-and-shoot.

    My plan is to get into nature and wildlife photography professionaly (as a side job, as I'm shooting for Wildlife Biologist as my day job), and I'm wondering what gear would be good enough to take professional-quality images, providing I do my part.

    I was also considering trying to get a Rebel T1i..

    So, anyone here try out the SX1? Maybe someone has a side-by-side comparison of SX10-SX1-DSLR?
     
  2. CW Jones

    CW Jones TPF Noob!

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    I would say if you plan on doing this professionally that a DSLR would be a good solid choice. If you want to save some money check places like Adorama.com for some good deals on used bodys. I just got a Canon 30D from them used and it looks brand new and works great! What I am trying to say is dont be afraid of used equiptment.

    If you are planning on professionally doinng anything in photography... I would suggest getting a MAC of some sort. I know people will say you dont need one, but MAC's accel at picture editing, so its just something else to think about.

    Any DSLR would be great to learn on, if you go with a Point and Shoot you are most likely going to wish you got a DSLR. Interchangable lenses do get expensive... but being able to change the lenses for the focal length you need is priceless.

    I am no expert and I dont claim to be one, these are just my thoughts and opinions on what you asked about. Hope this helps!

    -Collin
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    CMOS vs CCD is just a different technology. While CMOS may be the 'better technology'....it doesn't necessarily make a 'point & shoot' camera anywhere near as good as a real DSLR camera.

    A bigger factor is the physical size of the sensor. The SX1 has a sensor that is 6.16 x 4.62 mm, (0.28 cm²)...very small. Compare that to the sensor in the Canon 'crop' DSLR cameras like the EOS T1i...22.3 x 14.9 mm (3.32 cm²). Or compare that to a full frame sensor like the 5D II: 36 x 24 mm (8.64 cm²)

    My advice would be to forget about any camera that isn't a real DSLR. Otherwise you will likely find yourself, sooner or later, confined by the limitations of the camera/lens....and needing to buy something altogether different. With a DSLR, you can always upgrade the lens or even the body when needed.

    SIDE BY SIDE
     

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