Canon T2i

Discussion in 'Canon Cameras' started by NPostalwait, Apr 16, 2012.

  1. NPostalwait

    NPostalwait TPF Noob!

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    Thinking about upgrading my point n shoot to a Canon T2i. I am somewhat of a beginner to the DSLR cameras. before I move onto my question, going to let you all know what I do on a daily basis, also I am just making sure I am getting the correct camera for the job. I work for a local car dealership and am in the market for a new camera. I take about 300-500 photos a day, and that number can jump up to 800-900 easily, and have a photo booth setup as well. Now this is on a daily basis and our point and shoot cameras have been lasting us for about a year. This is why I am wanting to go to a professional grade camera, but is it going to be worth it in the long run? Or is there a better choice in camera, the reliability and quality is what I am looking for as well as price, not looking for the cheapest camera, but not the most expensive either.
     
  2. fotomumma09

    fotomumma09 TPF Noob!

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    The T2i is NOT a professional dslr. It's an entry level camera.
     
  3. nmoody

    nmoody No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    As stated above the T2i is a entry level consumer DSLR camera. Its by no means bad, if fact I find it to be one of the better values for your dollar. Its just not technically professional. The difference between the T2i and professional are more advanced features, better build quality (metal bodies and sometimes weather sealing).

    Considering you have been using a P&S this is will more the exceeded your requirements. I dont think you will need any of the professional series features.
     
  4. Jeff92

    Jeff92 TPF Noob!

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    You failed to mention that the t2i has a crop sensor (1.6x) I believe compared to a full frame sensor in high end cameras such as the 7d and mark cameras.

    Edit: my noob is showing. Disregard this entire post as it is not here :)
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2012
  5. NPostalwait

    NPostalwait TPF Noob!

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    Ok, well that is good to know. And I do not need a professional grade camera, just something that is going to last me longer than a point and shoot. Also I would like to have control over how my photo turns out. The point and shoot I have now has no options as far as shutter speed or aperture, or anything. The only option I have of course is the ISO. But for the money, if this T2i lasts at least 5 years, I can show my company the worth in going to a DSLR instead of a point and shoot. So would this be better money wise to go with a DSLR rather than a point and shoot? I am looking at about 300-400 every year on a point and shoot versus 650 ish on a DSLR every 5. That is of course if the DSLR will last that long. Or do you all have any opinions on a camera I should go with other than a DSLR?
     
  6. Hickeydog

    Hickeydog TPF Noob!

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    The 7D and T2i share the exact same sensor. The only full frame cameras in the Canon lineup are the 1D and 5D series.

    With that said, the difference between a "pro" camera and the T2i (as stated above) are the extra, dedicated buttons, metal frame, bigger body (the T2i is pretty small), and faster burst shooting, just to name a few. However, you are far better off getting a T2i and getting some good glass instead of buying a more expensive body and cheaping out on the lens.

    For "Studio" type work, where you can adjust, and reshoot and adjust some more, the T2i is just fine. If you're going to be shooting sports indoors, then a pro grade camera (like the 5D) would be in order.
     
  7. rexbobcat

    rexbobcat Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Consider this setup for versatility shooting cars and people:

    T2i
    Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8

    Cheap but effective.
     
  8. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    That is pretty much irrelevant to this thread. Also, the 7D does not have a full frame sensor, and 'Mark' is not necessarily a indication of quality or level...just that it's the newer version of a camera with the same model number.

    Going with a DSLR does have many advantages, but most of them may or may not be directly applicable to your situation. Although, one thing to keep in mind is that a typical DSLR is part of a system. So the lens will be interchangeable and you could upgrade or replace the lens if needed. On that point, the moving parts of a DSLR camera (the shutter & the mirror) can be serviced, repaired or replaced....usually for much less than the replacement value of the camera itself. So as a long term investment, it's a much better option. Also, a DSLR (and the lens, especially high quality lenses) will hold their value quite well. So if the camera had to be sold in 3-5 years, it would still hold some value. Where as a 3-5 year old point & shoot is practically worthless on the used market.

    To be fair, most point & shoot cameras don't have mechanical shutters or mirrors, so they don't have the same moving parts to wear out. I guess we should ask what it is that is causing you to replace the P&S cameras every year?

    It sounds like you may be focused on quantity (of images) over quality...so like I said, many of the advantages of a DSLR might be wasted. But you did mention full control over the camera, and any DSLR will certainly give you that.
     
  9. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I'd suggest that that combination would not be wide enough to shoot car interiors. Heck, even the T2i with an 18-55mm might be tricky at times.
     
  10. NPostalwait

    NPostalwait TPF Noob!

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    Thank you Mike, that helped out a lot. One of the selling points to me on a DSLR is that it can be serviced and be bought for cheaper than spending 300 a year on a P&S. Now that problems I am experiencing with the last 2 Nikon point and shoots that I have had( Coolpix P80 and Coolpix L120) is that I am have trouble getting a focused shot, mainly on the interior of the vehicle. Also having a problem with the photo being too dark on a few of my shots. Have adjusted the camera as much as I can and still cannot get a good lit photo even with the flash on. Keep in mind as well the shots I am talking about are me sitting in the back seat of the vehicle and getting a cockpit shot of the car as well as any extras that may be there such as Nav, Shifter if it not on the column, etc. As far as lenses gos, I will probably stick the the 18-55mm that comes with the camera for now until I learn more about the DSLR setup and features.
     
  11. jaomul

    jaomul Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    If your p+s is doing the trick but lasting a year I suggest you keep buying them. At 600 shots a day, taking weekends out you are above 100000 shots a year. Mid level canon dslrs are rated at 150000 shots (7d) I think. Entry level dslrs are not rated but may expect them to be 100000+, but still your into a year or two before there expected life goes with quite an extra premium for image quality that may not be needed. I suggest (if you really need the image q and the p+s are not suitable)you look into some mirrorless design cameras that have less moving parts (this was already hinted at above)and maybe will last longer, such as sony alpha35 or similar, maybe even some 4/3 systems
     
  12. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    Shutters can be replaced, at about $300 a pop, plus the time the camera has to be in the shop for the repair (at least a week plus shipping time 2 ways).

    Whatever you get, get 2.
     

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