Canon Vs Canon

Discussion in 'Digital Discussion & Q&A' started by goose1, Aug 31, 2009.

  1. goose1

    goose1 TPF Noob!

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    Hi just found this forum and it's great.

    I know almost nothing about cameras. So maybe you can help.
    A friend has a Canon Power Shot A-95 like new for sale, but i also have been
    looking at the new Canon PowerShot SX120 IS, just released.
    The A-95 lens are Zoom lens - 7.8 mm - 23.4 mm - F/2.8-4.9
    and the Canon PowerShot SX120 IS.10.00x zoom
    (36-360mm eq.). I don't know the meaning of these numbers.
    So guessing the newer Canon SX lens might be a little better.
    I like taking pictures of family, pets and nature.
    Any reviews on the SX120 would be appreciated?
    Thanks.
     
  2. Mendoza

    Mendoza TPF Noob!

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    The millimeter numbers (e.g. "38-114mm" or "36-360mm") usually translate to the range a lens can zoom ~ higher numbers mean farther distance.
    Another way of saying essentially the same thing is something like "10x" or "4x" zoom. Sometimes zoom in this case is defined as "optical" or "digital" -- optical being better. The SX120 has a 10x optical zoom, the A95 has a 3x optical zoom.
    The "F/" refers to the aperture, which translates to how 'open' or sensitive the lens is to light. Aperture is measured in F-Stops: for example: "1.4, 1.8, 2, 2.2, 2.5, 2.8, 3.2, 3.5, 4, 4.5, 5, 5.6, 6.3, 7.1, 8, 9, 10, 11, 13, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22..". The best lenses in terms of aperture are of course those that offer the highest range. The lowest number (1.4) has the greatest sensitivity to light (widest opening) while the highest (22) has the least sensitivity to light. However, lower F-stops also mean shallower depth-of-field (the range of things that are in focus) while higher F-stops mean greater depth-of-field. Since we're talking about point-and-shoot cameras here, stuff like depth-of-field is less important; but it is important to know the basics like shutter speed, F-stop, and ISO.

    I don't have those cameras but you should go with the SX120 if it's between the two. The 10x (vs 3x) zoom alone is a huge plus, and the SX120 also has 10 megapixels whereas the A95 has 5 megapixels which under certain circumstances is a plus.
     
  3. goose1

    goose1 TPF Noob!

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    Thanks. I appreciate the detailed information.
    Will go for the SX120.
     
  4. dngrov257

    dngrov257 TPF Noob!

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    Get neither. Instead, buy the A1100 or the SD1200. There will be situations in which you'll wish you had a viewfinder, despite the limitations on these small cameras. Both models have a viewfinder, which is becoming rare in the point and shoots. There are times because of glare, you just cannot see the LCD screen. If you a hand holding at low shutter speed, you can reduce camera shake by holding it up to your face.

    The SD 1200 is better built, but only has a 3X zoom as opposed to a 4X zoom on the A1100.
     
  5. goose1

    goose1 TPF Noob!

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    Thanks, Will check these out.
     

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