Charging for prints

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Bosscat, Mar 31, 2005.

  1. Bosscat

    Bosscat TPF Noob!

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    Last weekend I was asked by a snowmobile dealer to take some shots of his sponsored riders at a race. He said he would pay me for them. he wants the 4x6 prints of just his sponsored riders.

    Now the question is how much do I ask???

    I have a dollar into each print, when I figure in my film and printing costs.

    I was just there shooting for my own use and look at this as a bonus.
     
  2. LizM

    LizM TPF Noob!

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    I'd say offer them to him for $5 each. Yes,I know lots of folks will scream that is too low - I don't care. I'd rather have something than nothing. But, I would stipulate that he credits you with a byline whenever he uses the photos. Nothing like getting paid for free publicity. Have a stack of business cards for him when you talk to him again and if he likes the shots talk to him about maybe shooting future races on a contract basis. Figure out what you want as an hourly rate and then quote a per race price based on that. Also, quote a number of shots you expect to take.

    Good luck!
     
  3. photong

    photong Typo Queen

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    i was tought the rule is charge twice as much as what it costs you. so if it costs a dollar per print when you factor in the film, processing and printing (also figure out what you time is worth is you want to charge even more. i think if you're a professional its ok. but it sounds like he doesn't want to go that route and expecting this to not cost as much as it could) then charge two dollars a print :)

    i agree about the buisness card things. sooo good to do. usually you can get cheapo basic ones at a print place, or you can buy those at home things which are good as well. :) and much cheaper.
     
  4. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Ask him what he's going to do with them as well. If they are for a display, maybe offer to do them for free in exchange for promoting you with a note underneath or something. If they are just snapshots, charge cost + expenses.

    The nicer you are the first time you do business, the more you will be able to charge on the repeat times and the more business they will put your way!
     
  5. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    If he's using them for personal use, like just in the store photo album, then you should get at least 2 times what they cost you to make. I would consider other expenses accumulated that day beside just reprint costs. There's nothing wrong with breaking even, and it'll still be a deal for him.

    If he's going to scan them and use them in local advertising and promotion, then I don't think $100 each is unreasonable, in fact it's way cheap! If you feel like that's too much charge $50 or $20 each, but that's almost giving them away. Good luck.
     
  6. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    Actually, my experience is that "if you give them an inch, they'll take a mile". You do something cheap for a commercial client once, they are going to want it that cheap until the end of time. Also I've found that cheapskate customers are always ten times the pain in the ass as customers who are willing to pay fair value.

    Many people have no way of judging the quality of photography except by price. They are thinking if you sell a photo for $2 you must be an amateur, and why would they ever pay you any more? If you are charging something closer to what the local pros would charge (it doesn't have to be what they would charge, but at least half), then you are an up and coming pro, and they will value you even more. Don't undersell yourself. Save the freebie work for friends. If that guy is making $$$ off your photos of snow-mobiles, then you should get your share.
     
  7. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Matt is certainly right, but I would say that in the UK all small business is done by word-of-mouth and I have faith in all my good clients and they have faith in me.

    That isn't to say that I haven't been screwed around by cheapskates who didn't know a good deal when they saw it!

    To echo Matt - definately don't under-sell yourself - you'll be surprised at the actual cost of the day when you add it up.

    R
     

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