cheap lighting

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by nomav6, Sep 1, 2006.

  1. nomav6

    nomav6 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    0
    I need some cheap lighting that is portable, I'll be doing a lot of shooting at night in a parking lot, they will be action shots, anywhere from 5mph to 90mph, any suggestions?
     
  2. KevinR

    KevinR TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2005
    Messages:
    1,204
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Dearborn, MI
    What is cheap? and by portable, do you mean battery powered?
     
  3. nomav6

    nomav6 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    0
    cheap is less then $100usd, and portable as in can run them in the middle of a parking lot, maybe off my truck or something, but yea battery powered would be awesome too.
     
  4. Azuth

    Azuth TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 25, 2005
    Messages:
    262
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Sydney 'strailya
    Lots and lots of flashlights taped together?
    Seriously, how big is the thing you're photographing? How far away will it be from the lights? How bright does it need to be?
     
  5. nomav6

    nomav6 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    0
    it'll be motocycles, the area doesn't have to be huge, and I was thinking about just getttng a lot of flashlights or something like that :)
     
  6. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2004
    Messages:
    5,346
    Likes Received:
    65
    Location:
    Santa Barbara, CA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    To freeze motion like that at night, you'll really need strobes/flashes. They fire a bright burst of light, with a duration of less than 1/1000 / sec. It's just not going to be cheap. Alienbees makes a good, low priced kit, and they make battery packs that you can take with you to power them in the field. You are looking at over $1000 though. You could use a hotshoe flash, but it would be limiting in terms of power output, and still would be over $100.

    Try high speed black and white film, and just use the available light, which I'm assuming in a parking lot would be something like street lights. ISO 3200 film "might" allow you to stop some motion.
     
  7. nomav6

    nomav6 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 14, 2004
    Messages:
    253
    Likes Received:
    0
    not really worried about freeze motion, I would love to have strobes but dont have the money, was thinking about something like this [ame]http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00076Q0JC/ref=reg_hu-wl_item-added/104-3097736-8543116?ie=UTF8[/ame]
     
  8. JamesD

    JamesD Between darkrooms

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2005
    Messages:
    1,002
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Living in Snapshot reality.
    Keep in mind: Those are power hungry. If you use two of them, that's 1000 watts. A kilowatt at 120 volts AC is going to be hard to supply to a parking lot; extension cords aren't a good idea for several reasons. If you've got a generator, that could work.

    And no, you shouldn't use one of those 12-120 DC to AC converters they sell for running household stuff from a car's cigarette lighter. Two of those lights would draw 8.3 amps at 120 volts, which translates to 83 amps at 12 volts. Most household circuits are 20 Amps at most... and I believe that most car power outlets and cigarette lighters are, too. 83 amps is a LOT of current... trip breakers, blow fuses, or worse, start fires.
     
  9. c_mac

    c_mac TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2006
    Messages:
    153
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
  10. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2004
    Messages:
    4,237
    Likes Received:
    6
    Location:
    Rochester, NY Velocity: Unknown
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    An important thing to know is that light falls off very quickly. Every time you double the distance, you get only a 1/4 of the light. At two feet, you get 1/4 of the light that you had at 1'. At 4', you get 1/4 again, or 1/16 of that at 1'. At 8', 1/64. At 16', 1/256. Whatever you are shooting will have to be close. And with the background all black, you'll have to be very careful in how you meter the subject. If you go with the standard matrix metering and the subject doesn't take up the frame, you'll probably blow out the subject.
     
  11. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Nov 15, 2003
    Messages:
    9,523
    Likes Received:
    344
    Location:
    North New Jersey, United States of America
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Anyway to do the photoshoot at a football or baseball stadium equiped with lights for night time games? Might be worth the $$ or donation.
     

Share This Page