Chemicals

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by journeyman, Jul 15, 2006.

  1. journeyman

    journeyman TPF Noob!

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    Okay I've wanted to post this for a while just to get opinions and with a paycheck apporaching seem like the right time since I'll have money.

    What chemicals are best for the darkroom I'm setting up?
    This includes For Film:
    Develper
    Stop
    Fix
    Clear

    And for the print:
    Developer
    Stop
    Fix

    The type of Shooting I do Is all Black and White 35mm. Mostly landscpaes So I want No a lot of grain and High Acutance (I think that's the word)

    I shoot tmax 100 ussually

    I have previously used D-76 for film devlopment with a water stop bath ande can't remeber the rest

    And for prints I used Dektol

    Okay Opinions On any of the information provided would br great thanks. If you think somethings missing or If I need something different for my situation feel free to let me know.
     
  2. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Unless you have a good reason to do otherwise, start with the manufacturer's recommendations. It will give you a good base line to compare other stuff against. The only specific recommendations I'll make are Dektol [It's as close to a universal print developer as you can get], any major brand acetic acid stop bath [instead of just water] and plain old Kodak fixer.
     
  3. Solarize

    Solarize TPF Noob!

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  4. journeyman

    journeyman TPF Noob!

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    How do you feel about Kodak D-23 I hear it has Sodium Sulfide to produce fine grain yet with a short enough devolpment time to keep a higher acutance

    This was sourced from an Ansel Adams book
     

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