Choose the right film?

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by PhotographyIsConfusing, Dec 29, 2008.

  1. PhotographyIsConfusing

    PhotographyIsConfusing TPF Noob!

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    What is the difference between different brands of film, except ISO/ASA? Does 100 film that cost $8 be better than on the comes in a pack of three for $6?
     
  2. bhop

    bhop No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I assume you're talking color film here since I can't think of any $6 packs for b&w.

    There can be many differences. Usually the cheap 3 pack drug store film has more graininess, even at 100iso, than the more expensive "Pro" film, which will have smoother grain and hold more detail.

    Another difference might be color hues. For example, I got some 99ยข store film once to test a "new" camera and the results were pretty undesirable cool magenta tones.

    Yet another difference might be contrast. Pro films will most likely have more of it.
     
  3. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    A lot of times you might find that your drug store house brand 100 is really 400 that is DX coded for 100 so that it tells your camera to expose it at 100 and tells the processers to process it as 100. Hence the grain. Better name usually denotes better quality.
     
  4. epp_b

    epp_b No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Wow, really? Isn't that, like, fraud?
     
  5. therustytracks

    therustytracks TPF Noob!

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    No that's business as usual..unfortunately. I use the cheapo kodak max 200 and fuji superia xtra 400 for pretty much anything I'm doing that's not serious. It's ok for skateboarding sequences depending on the lighting. The colors are a bit dry and leave you lusting for a bit more. I've had some really great results from Kodak Portra and fuji nps and nph. Superia is decent at 100 or 200, but the 400 is really grainy when I scan it in. If you're just looking for a roll of film to hold an image and you're not worried about color saturation go for the cheap packs of film. I love buying a 6 pack of color neg. for $5. I don't feel as bad when I don't get the perfect image. Spending $5-7 on a roll of film and then dissappointing yourself is not fun.
     
  6. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

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    I would go for Fuji Reala. Great film. Very affordable. Reasonably available.
     
  7. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    And no, definitely not fraud. Just grainier than usual ISO100. A lot of photographers increase/decrease exposure and push/pull process film. Film can be very easy to manipulate. They just package it that way. Less to purchase from somebody else I guess. You gotta love consumer-driven economics.
     
  8. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The more expensive films have been refrigerated since production and have generally been better taken care of than the wal-mart specials. (hence the extra cost)

    There are also different formulations to consider. Velva is much different than supra for instance. Supra is the same as press with out the care taken from the factory.


    BTW, there is a B&W film that Patrick (of this forum) uses (I asked him ;)) called Adox that you guys might want to look into. The 25 may in fact be Rollei-films pan 25. This needs more research but the examples I've seen look terrific!
     
  9. PhotographyIsConfusing

    PhotographyIsConfusing TPF Noob!

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    I'm asking about both color and black and white print and color slide film. I know what ISO is but how do you choose the right film for what your shooting?
     
  10. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Try going over to photosig.com and look at photos by film type to get an idea which film will do what.
     
  11. ully

    ully TPF Noob!

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    I can't believe some of the opinion that I read are real. Have you ever looked at the grain structures of different film, they are totally different. Kodak does not just run off one type of film and then package it all under different labels and ISO ratings.
     
  12. christopher walrath

    christopher walrath No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    ISO as you know is relative to a film's sensitivity to light. Slow speed films (ISO up to 50) are great for still lifes and very bright subjects. Medium speed films (ISO 100-200) are fantastic for portraits, some mild action and still yield great detail. Fast speed films (ISO 400 to 800) are great multi-use films. Still good detail and they will provide better coverage for action shots because they allow faster shutter speeds. Ultra fast film speeds (ISO 1600 on up) are great for lower light and super fast action but will show more grain.
     

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