Circular Polarizer for Wide Angle Lens

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by jon3k, Jan 4, 2007.

  1. jon3k

    jon3k TPF Noob!

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    (Wasn't sure where else to post this, please move if i'm in the wrong place)

    I'm trying to find an appropriate circular polarizer for a Canon 17-40 f/4L (accepts 77mm filters). So I was browsing B&H and I'm kind of lost here.

    I'm looking at all the 77 mm circular polarizers

    Any advice would be appreciated. What to look for, what to avoid, etc.
     
  2. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    Different brands have different levels of quality and price. B&W is a top brand and costs more. 'General brand', what ever that is, costs less and may not be as good. I don't know the precise differences...so I usually pick a brand that isn't the cheapest...but not the most expensive either.

    Some of the other things that effect the price...
    Multi-coated (MC)...is an added feature that reduces glare. If you can afford it, it might be worth it.
    Another thing is the slimness of the filter. For wide angle lenses, a thick filter may cause vignetting. The 17-40 certainly is a wide angle lens...when used on a 35mm film camera or on a 'full frame' camera like the 5D or 1Ds. If you are using it on a digital body like the Rebels or a 20/30D...then the edges are cropped off anyway...so a thin filter would be a waste.
     
  3. jon3k

    jon3k TPF Noob!

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    I'm sorry - I should have said in my original post, camera is a Rebel XT. But I've got this pipe dream of owning a 5D one day, so better get a filter thats a little too thin now :)

    What about the "Kaessman" stuff? Can anyone else comment on the SHMC/HMC, is it worth it?
     
  4. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    You should understand that using polarizers on wide angle lenses is problematic. Polarized light only enters the lens at certain angles from the sun. Since wide angle lenses involve a wide angle of view, you will be filtering polarized light in some areas of the frame but not others. In other words the filtration will be uneven across the frame.

    My rule of thumb for 35mm cameras was that using a polarizer on lenses of 24mm focal length or shorter was usually not advised. Your 17mm lens on a digital format should be fine but when you move to a 35mm sized sensor, it will probably be too wide to get even filtration across the frame.

    I promised I would refrain from comments on my opinons of filter quality and value so I'll leave your second question to others.

    Hope this helps. Good shooting.
     
  5. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I use exactly that combination: The Canon 5D and the 17-40mm 4 L

    my poliriser of choice is the

    B+W 77 Kaesemann Circular Polarizer SLIM

    Using the slim line minimizes the danger of dark corners in wide angle on ful frame. I agree though that right at 17mm using a polarizer might be problematic and i seldom do it, but for the less extreme wide angles of that lens it works just fine.

    [edit:] I am not saying though, that cheaper options do not work. But whatever you get, make it slim.
     
  6. jon3k

    jon3k TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the responses, I appreciate it.

    Can anyone explain what the deal with "Kaesemann" is?
     
  7. All I can contribute at this point is:

    Polarizer on Wide-Angle could be a problem, but I've gotten some interesting shots that way.

    "Kaesemann" in German means Cheese Man. I grew up in Berlin, where calling something Kaese meant it was no good. I don't believe that means anything in regards to the product or manufacturer, but is of endless humor to my fellow Germans on this forumboard.
     
  8. jon3k

    jon3k TPF Noob!

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    lol, that's halarious, thanks, if I'm ever in Germany I'll be sure not to mention it :)
     
  9. LAW2

    LAW2 TPF Noob!

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    Having done a bit of research on the subject lately the only thing that I can add is that "Kaesemann" style filter means that the different layers of the filter are sealed and less prone to environmental changes (condensation).
     

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