Color Film for B&W Photos

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by allansiew, Oct 26, 2005.

  1. allansiew

    allansiew TPF Noob!

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    If I have taken photos on a film, the normal type of film that produces color photos. When I want to developed the photo how do I make it B&W?
     
  2. Patrick

    Patrick TPF Noob!

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    I would say you'd have to either have them scanned or scan the negs yourself then do a conversion to black and white in Photoshop.
     
  3. Patrick

    Patrick TPF Noob!

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    oppps...Unlesss you use one of the C-41 black and white films to start with. They are processed just like color film at your local one hour lab or pro shop
     
  4. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    If you have colour negs then you can get B&W prints from them by printing onto Kodak Panalure paper. It's a panchromatic B&W printing paper and you treat the whole thing as if you are printing from B&W negs. The only thing that you have to do differently is do the whole process in total darkness.
    I've used it on occasion and it's pretty good.
    http://www.kodak.com/global/en/prof...eSelectRcPaper.jhtml?id=0.1.16.14.28.44&lc=en
     
  5. nealjpage

    nealjpage multi format master in a film geek package

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    Not to hijack, but what happens if you project color negs onto black and white paper?
     
  6. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    Not a lot. Some colour negs have a deep yellow base tint - normal b&w paper tends to be relatively insensitive to this colour.
    You can get an image if you give it a very long exposure but the quality tends to be pants.
    I have heard some people claim they have done it succesfully but I'm sceptical.
     
  7. JamesD

    JamesD Between darkrooms

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    How about making prints with that chromogenic C-41 process black and white film? Do you just use a really looooong exposure? Will variable-contrast filtering still work?

    I must try this, now that I have a darkroom!
     
  8. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    The C41 film doesn't have the yellow base dye and it's image is B&W so it works just like an ordinary B&W neg.
     

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