colors in photoshop...

Discussion in 'Digital Discussion & Q&A' started by wxnut, Aug 18, 2008.

  1. wxnut

    wxnut TPF Noob!

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    So I edit my photos in CS2 to look like I want them to look. After I post them to the net and look at it on the same monitor, it looks dull and the colors just do not pop like it looked while open in CS2. Are their some settings I messed up somewhere?

    I start out RAW, edit, save as a jpg, then upload it to my server.

    Thank you for your time,

    Doug Raflik
     
  2. prodigy2k7

    prodigy2k7 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    After you save them from CS2, open them in windows picture viewer, do the colors look the same, then different after you post them online? The online uploader may be reducing the quality. I dont know much about color spaces, someone else may provide a better explanation
     
  3. wxnut

    wxnut TPF Noob!

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    When opened up with other graphic programs, they look like I described, (dull) so it seems to be a photoshop problem.
     
  4. tempra

    tempra TPF Noob!

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    Set your colour space to sRGB in photoshop, it's probably set to adobe RGB which displays great in PS but dull and horrible on the net - most browsers will only support sRGB, so edit in that.
     
  5. wxnut

    wxnut TPF Noob!

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    That was it!!! Thanks. Question now is will this effect my prints when I send them to the lab?
     
  6. tempra

    tempra TPF Noob!

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    It's probably worth asking your lab what colour space they use, lots of them use sRGB or their printers convert the files to sRGB before printing.

    If they use a different colour space, then you would have to create two separate files, but whichever one, you can convert them in PS to whatever colour space you require (as long as it's installed) then export them to a print file.
     
  7. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    It's a colour management issue. sRGB is a standard. If a lab is not setup to read IEC profiles directly out of the file then they will assume it is sRGB.

    Generally if you want to avoid a colossal headache then in camera raw (or in the camera depending on where you get your files from) set it to sRGB and not AdobeRGB, and then ignore it. Otherwise it's a lot to learn, and a lot of steps during the process to get right.
     
  8. Dmitri

    Dmitri No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Good answers. Some questions

    1: Is there a way to set the default to sRGB in Raw or PS? I couldn't seem to find any way to do this.
    EDIT: Nevermind. I just found out that after setting one to sRGB, it becomes the default.
    2: I also spotted in Raw to use photos at 16 bits instead of 8 bits. I know 8 bits is highest for internet, but does 16 or 8 matter when printing?

    Any other tips :)
     
  9. tempra

    tempra TPF Noob!

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    16 bit will give you maximum amount of colours and information, this helps when you are post processing.

    For printing, the same applies as long as your printer can interpret the 16bit file however if you are uploading it to an online printer or taking it to a lab they may only deal with 8 bit images - also some filters won't work on 16 bit in PS so you have to convert it to 8 bit.

    That help?
     
  10. Dmitri

    Dmitri No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    lol I think so. You're saying keep it 8 bit unless I'm working pro on a magazine cover or something? :)
     
  11. tempra

    tempra TPF Noob!

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    It really depends on how much control you want, how much storage space you have and how much grunt your PC has.

    I just did a quick trial and an 8 bit tiff exports at 36.4mb whereas the same file as a 16 bit tiff exports at 72.8mb - both at 300dpi

    *checks prices on new hard drives*
     
  12. Dmitri

    Dmitri No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    :lol::lol: Gotcha. I'll stick with 8 bit then, until I have some reason to do otherwise. Thanks Tempra :)
     

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