colour saturation

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by voodoo_child, Sep 9, 2006.

  1. voodoo_child

    voodoo_child TPF Noob!

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    This is a bit of a hazy subject for me...
    Is it how "deep" or "strong" a colour is?
    would you say the green field and blue sky are saturated in this photo?
    http://www.flickr.com/photo_zoom.gne?id=192323087&context=set-72157594169149947&size=o

    How is this achieved? By slightly underexposing?

    crawdaddio I hope you dont mind me using your lovely photo as an example.
    I find a photo I really like, analyze it, decipher what I like about it, then try to understand the technique to recreate it.

    Sorry if I'm getting annoying with the questions :lol:
     
  2. Korosive

    Korosive TPF Noob!

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    It was probably done in post-production in a program. Most likely photoshop.
     
  3. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    Color saturation, simply put, is the comparison of a color, to a grey value of equal brightness. (Grey having no color) How much color does it have? What intensity?

    How is it done? Well, it all depends on the medium you are shooting. Contrast, and the use of polarizing filters will certainly help, by filtering out haze and stray light that lessens the intensity of the color.

    Different films produce different saturation, based on the pigments used. With digital, you have 1000 options to tweak the color satuation, hue, and brightness.

    Color, as our eyes see it, is made up red, green, and blue wavelengths. In equal parts, these equal 100% white. Bearing that in mind, the more exposure you give your photograph, the closer you get to "white", thus, the less saturation, so YES, underexposing a reasonable amount, does in fact give more saturation than a shot that is overexposed.
     
  4. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    looking at the extreme vignetting in that image (upper corners in particular), i guess that was increased in the process of intensifying saturation and contrast post-shooting (electronically .. pushing the slider far into the disney-colour region ;) ) .. could have also been a stack of filters causing the vignette ;)

    for film I often use fuji velvia, then you get similar saturation, however with warmer colours.
     
  5. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Questions are for asking!!!!
    Let'S hope you do not get too many annoying answers ;)
     
  6. voodoo_child

    voodoo_child TPF Noob!

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    Oh right! So this kind of effect is usually done by editing your picture later.
    well for now Im only interested in techniques at exposure time and Im shooting with film anyway.
    I'll check out velvia(whatever it is!)
    thanks for the replies
     
  7. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Fuji Velvia is a pro slide film. It comes as Velvia 50 (ISO that is), 100 and 100F. All of them are pretty expensive.

    All three have very fine grain, colour saturation and contrast is high in all of them, with the 50 and the 100F being almost identical. The 100 however, does not really match the 50 and give strange colours in my eyes.

    I chose Velvia 100F for a trip to Egypt early this year and was not disappointed (we had (sand) storm though, which gave greyish skies :( .. so I was not totally happy with the images after all, but this cannot be blamed on the film).

    Due to its intense colours it is often used in wildlife/landscape shooting .. makes grey days less dull ;)

    Some people dislike it and call it disneycolor ;)

    It is not a good option for portrait, as it is no good in skin tones.

    But there are other choices, and similar things for negative film.
     

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