Comments wanted, philosophy of portraiture

Discussion in 'People Photography' started by Dick Sanders, Jan 10, 2009.

  1. Dick Sanders

    Dick Sanders TPF Noob!

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  2. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

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    Excellent thread. And you know I love your work, but I think you and I have very different approaches to portraiture. I will (generally) shoot for hours until I am satisfied with the result. Some of my strongest work has come from one click, but I consider them as "accidents". This one is from my DJ series that basically got me into studio portraits and eventually sparked my interest in shooting models. Took me about an hour and a half to get this one. Most of my portrait sessions are a process that I feel brings out something that was once hidden.


    Love & Bass

    [UR[​IMG]
     
  3. Dick Sanders

    Dick Sanders TPF Noob!

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    --Well said, Craig. Maybe do the same post on the original thread -- to keep that discussion going, and to encourage others to share. What's interesting is that we "people photographers" find over time a method that works for us. And yours is certainly a good one.

    At some point I gravitated toward street photography, I suppose for the steady supply of interesting characters. And on the street, the subjects allow just a couple of minutes, so I've had to adapt to that. But that's what makes it both challenging and rewarding. Here's one I did of a very young mother at 5th & Main in Los Angeles.


    [​IMG]
     
  4. dtornabene1

    dtornabene1 TPF Noob!

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    Just when I reply to your post you move it! Damn you Dick Sanders! :lol:

    Seriously, both of you are so correct about the "process". Whether it is a few minutes or hours, it is a process. Getting it right is harder than it looks, mostly because we are our own toughest critics. (Although sometimes it seems some of the people here can be kind of overboard).

    I like the way we get the personality to show through the photograph. It is less about technical expertise and far more about feeling. Something is a little cut off, the color is not perfect, focus is off a bit, etc. So what!

    Has photography been completely reduced to all science and no art? I sure as hell hope not.

    -Nick
     
  5. Dick Sanders

    Dick Sanders TPF Noob!

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    I confess, I botched this one, Nick. Posted in the wrong category, then started this to encourage "People" photographers to check out those portraits and comment. You and Craig did. Thanks! And others are still welcome...
    http://www.thephotoforum.com/forum/...y/151974-cabinet-makers-wife.html#post1500048

    Also, well said -- Capturing the personality, and with feeling, that's really it. How about sharing one of yours that fits that description?
     
  6. dtornabene1

    dtornabene1 TPF Noob!

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    Don't get me wrong steez, I love when art and science mix. While I have art on one side, I hold degrees and certifications in science. You wouldn't believe how much I know about medicine or why I know it if I told you.

    I like the dichotomy of art and science. It's a balance. For example, as Dick mentioned, here is a photograph that has the subject centered. It has been converted to B/W and more importantly, the subject was unaware of my presence. The science guides me on technique of capture. But here, I get the image with little technical precision but better photographic awareness.

    She was deep in thought along the Atlantic Ocean. This is not posed. She was wondering about her future and where it was going to take her. Part of her wanted to just walk out into the ocean and let the water take over.

    But, each new wave gave her pause. You may not notice it in the photograph, but she is not content and idly watching the surf. She is actually quite troubled.

    [​IMG]

    -Nick
     
  7. Dick Sanders

    Dick Sanders TPF Noob!

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    Very nice, Nick.

    I really enjoy "show and tell." There's a story behind every photo we make. But when we describe we also "push" the viewer in a certain direction. But interestingly, your photo evokes much of what you describe. Still, with no caption, the viewer could project his or her own interpretation/meaning, which can be even more powerful.

    I like this photo. Thanks for sharing.
     

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