compromise to do both film and digital?

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by scyzoryk_o4, Mar 11, 2007.

  1. scyzoryk_o4

    scyzoryk_o4 TPF Noob!

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    Hey, I've recently started to really feel the restrictions of my "point and shoot" fujifilm finepix:er: and am planning to upgrade to a slr/dslr camera. Originally I thought i will go the digital rout and blow 1500-2000$(cdn):( on a canon D30 with lenses. However after looking into film cameras I came to realize that with a $200 slr i can get pictures the same or better quality then if i used a cannon 5d:drool:. And so now im on the fence between digital and film:confused:...

    After some serious contemplation i think what im going to do is:
    -Get a Nikon D50 ($500)- this will satisfy my need for a camera which i can use to take pictures which i plan to edit and have all that fun on photoshop:thumbup:
    -Get a Nikon F80($150-200)- This will satisfy my need to take high quality photos, as well my craving to go film..and last but not least by using a film camera i will be encouraged to actually go and get film developed rather then take a bunch of pics on my digital camera, store them on my computer till my hard drive crashes and end up loosing thousands of photos( this is what happened to me last year :banghead: , i almost threw my computer along with my digi out the window)
    - then go and pick out a couple slr lenses which i can use on both cameras ($300-500) not sure what lenses im going to get maybe a 28-70 and a 75-300??

    Now im a beginner and i was wondering if it's a good idea to jump into both mediums(film/digital) at once or better to get really familiar at one b4 trying the other.
    any input would be greatly appreciated and sry for the long post


    Maksym
     
  2. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    I can see no reason why you shouldn't do both. Some will disagree that 35mm film offers 'same or better' quality as current digital SLRs - but personally I don't think 'quality' is all that relevant, they're different mediums and it's possible to enjoy them both. You said yourself you have a 'craving' to use film so the cost of a film SLR would be money well spent. Fortunately with any of the main companies currently producing digital SLRs (with the exception of Olympus) you have the option of using autofocus film SLRs and digital SLRs with the same lenses. Though if you prefer Nikon then go for Nikon. One thing to consider is the so-called "crop factor" and the different field of view you get with any given focal length. Another thing to bear in mind is that the lenses designed only for small-sensor digital SLRs will not work properly on 35mm film SLRs. Lenses designed for 35mm SLRs will however work fine on the smaller-sensor digitals so long as they are physically and electronically compatible with the camera. Therefore you may be a little limited for lens choice if you only want lenses that will work on both film and digital SLRs - especially when it comes to wider lenses. But for the most part I think if you want to shoot both film and digital - and I do - it makes quite a bit of sense to have an SLR/dSLR setup and one set of lenses for both. Go for it :thumbup:
     
  3. Aquarium Dreams

    Aquarium Dreams TPF Noob!

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    I agree. If it's within your means, and it's what you want, why not do both? One of the bonuses of doing both is that you can get the most out of wide angle shots with your film camera. Another is that you'll always have an extra slr on hand. I started with film and switched to digital, but I still love film. The most frustrating thing about film, if you're shooting color negatives, is that unless you work at a photo lab, you'll always have to trust development and printing to someone else.

    When I'm going out for a "serious" shoot, I bring the digital. If I'm going out just for fun, and want a camera along for the ride, I bring the film slr, mostly because it's lighter and since it was relatively inexpensive, I don't care about it getting banged up by being constantly in my bag. Once I get a wide angle lens, I will mostly use film for that, also (due to the crop factor on the 400d).

    Anyway, my point is that as you become accustomed to them, you'll find instances where one will suit you better than the other. I wish I had learned it all at once!
     
  4. scyzoryk_o4

    scyzoryk_o4 TPF Noob!

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    Ah thank you very much. I think this is what i will do. Except i plan to take my "more serious shots" with the slr rather then the dslr.But ya as soon as i get my visa paid off im going to start sitting on ebay looking for a good deal. thanks again


    Maksym
     
  5. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I disagree here... I have both a 5D and a Canon film camera. Using the same lenses and with the film body using ultra fine grain film and a semi-pro Nikon scanner, film just about touches the quality my digital 5D gives in rare cases. And the effort with the 5D is much less if the final goal is a digital image - proper scanning is quite an effort!

    However, depending on the film used, the film camera wins in situations with complicated light.

    Anyway, no reason to stay away from film :)
     
  6. Garbz

    Garbz No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Somedays you just want to go for analogue! I still use my 35mm. Mainly for artsy shots like with ISO100 film loaded being exposed for 4 hours or so. Or with Kodak HIE Infrared film. Film is versatile and fun even for a digital photographer. And there's no arguing if you need to blow out highlights it's much more plesant on film than on digital.
     
  7. Alex_B

    Alex_B No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    well... I shot slide film for more than 10 years ... and the highlights can be a pain there as well ;)
     
  8. joyride

    joyride TPF Noob!

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    I say go for both. I have the D50 with an N70. Sometimes I just feel in the mood to shoot film. However, I only shoot B&W because thats all I can do in my darkroom. There is just something about film that digital will never be able to do. Likewise, there are some days that digital is the way to go. The only problem that I have with interchanging lenses is the magnification of the D50. The 50 mm is too magnified sometimes when on the D50.
     
  9. hostile

    hostile TPF Noob!

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    If I still had access to a dark room I would have kept my F60. I loved developing my own film.
     
  10. blackdoglab

    blackdoglab yeah I'm easy.... but I'm not cheap

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    Go with a film slr and a scanner (epsons are good and fairly inexpensive) and you'll probably have a good compromise.
     
  11. darich

    darich TPF Noob!

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    I think DSLR would be the way to go.

    You already have a digitial compact and are used to pointing, shooting and viewing. So will your friends and family. Film means a wait of a couple of days to process the film and get prints and even then you'd pay for prints that are rotten because you haven't viewed them.
    Digital means you view the images within seconds and only print the ones you like.
    Buy a memory card and fill it, download it and reuse the memory card.
    Buy a film camera, load it with film finish it, and then go buy another, and another, and another, ad nauseum.
    You'll know that apertures, exposures, dates are all embedded in a digital file.
    Film camera? if those details are important then carry a notebook and pen or a dictaphone.

    I had 2 film cameras aswell as a 6mp Digital Rebel. I intended to keep the film cameras but after about 2 months and never having lifted them they were sold.

    Quality wise, i'd say for prints up to around A4 size you'll be hard pressed to tell the difference. Buy a more expensing DSLR eg the 5D you mention and you'll be hard pressed to tell the difference until you print much larger.

    I learned more in a few months with my DSLR than i did with analogue SLR camera because of the instant results and checking the settings eg f2.8 compared f11.

    I know crop factors and lens focal lengths then can change depending on the camera but I'd still suggest digital - wider angle lenses can be bought to compensate.

    Personally i'd always recommend the digital SLR - especially 8-10mp DSLRs coming down in price so quickly.
     
  12. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    Those are all certainly benefits of using a dSLR... but the OP wants to use a dSLR and a film SLR. Personally I like doing this and it's not like you would waste a lot of money by trying it; if it doesn't work out one can simply sell the film bodies again at no great loss.
     

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