concert photography

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by pattt718, Dec 7, 2017.

  1. pattt718

    pattt718 TPF Noob!

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    Hello,

    I am new when it's about photography but lately I've been really into concert photpgraphy but i don't really know what kind of lenses are the best for that.

    I've got Canon 70D with kit lens and Canon 24 mm.

    Which lenses are the best for that kind of photography ? I would like to buy one wide angle and one zoom because I'm thinking about shooting big venues.

    Thanks for help


     
  2. ac12

    ac12 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    What kind of concert?
    - Symphonic is different from rock.

    How far are you from the stage?

    Lighting: indoor, outdoor day, outdoor night, all of these?

    How much gear can you carry?
    f/2.8 wide and tele zooms will feel HEAVY after carrying them for a few hours.
     
  3. pattt718

    pattt718 TPF Noob!

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    Mostly indoor rock. Vanues that I have on my mind are pretty big so that's the reason why I'm thinking about zooms and I'm aware that they might be heavy but I am not really sure witch one should I choose since my camera is not ff and I don't wanna waste money on sth what might not be necessary in this case.
     
  4. ac12

    ac12 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    80-200 f/2.8 IS
    • You need the large aperture, some venues are dim, and you will need the speed.
    • You probably cannot use a tripod, so you need IS.
    • On a 1.5x DX crop camera, the 80-200 is equivalent to a 120-300 on a FX body.
    If you want a wider shot, add the 24-70 f/2.8

    This is the standard PJ kit.
     
  5. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Be aware that some venues have an official photographer and can have restrictions on fan photography; and typically if they see you carrying a "big camera and lens" they might well not allow you to take it in (partly on the assumption that anyone with a camera and lens that big is a pro going to work not a fan). They might also not allow entry for bigger gear on grounds of health and safety and also property security (everyone's dancing, someone spills a drink on your expensive lens or knocks it out of your hands).


    For music concerts a few thoughts

    1) The lighting is BAD. No ifs or buts, from photography points of view the lighting will be bad. In fact I'd say its one of the most challenging situations to shoot with the light effects.

    2) You ideally want a lens with a wide aperture (small f number) to help gather as much light as possible. This helps with your exposures AND your auto focusing system.

    3) f2.8 or wider (smaller f number) is likely going to be what you're after. If you're a long distance away then you're limited to f2.8; if you're closer options broaden out as you gain the options like 50mm f1.4, 85mm lenses etc... Which offer you a much wider aperture; but you'll either have to have wider shots or be a lot closer for those to work (eg if you want to isolate the performer on stage).

    4) The crop cameras perform well and high end (L) lenses work great on them. Indeed many of the wide aperture lenses you're going to need are going to be in the top end of the market. This means a higher price tag a well.

    5) Fullframe would be the favoured choice since it gives you a wider angle of view compared to crop sensor, which is of benefit when working indoors and closer to subjects. Fullframe generally also have superior high ISO noise performance. The 70D is no slouch, but fullframe options from the same generation of cameras or newer, will have improved high ISO performance. That means being able to shoot shots clearer and with less light.


    Budget - is important. Basically this is one of those situations where both camera and lens are tested at their light gathering limits. This makes it a challenge, but also tends to put a lot more pressure on having good gear (esp if you're not using a flash). A rough idea of your budget would help a lot in guiding you; as well as your overall intention (hobby/fan/aiming to go pro), just to get an idea of where you want to take this interest.



    Edit - two lenses one camera is great; but in the practical world you'll find that you won't lens change all that often; esp if you're in the middle of the crowd. In that situation most photographers will have two cameras and two lenses so that they can just let one hang and use the other. A much faster way to change and safer too as you're not fiddling with pulling lenses on and off.
     
    • Informative Informative x 2
  6. ac12

    ac12 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    +1 on the two bodies.
     
  7. Braineack

    Braineack Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Enjoy the music.
     
  8. TCampbell

    TCampbell Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I've done concerts...

    Most venues have a camera policy. While it varies from venue to venue or artist to artist... I could generalize and say that one of the most common restrictions is that you cannot bring a camera that has a "removable lens" unless you have a photo pass (which you typically get from the artist... or their managers/agents). These photo passes sometimes come with a catch of what you are and are not permitted to shoot or when you can shoot, or where you can stand, etc.

    So for example... I've had mostly unrestricted passes that let me go anywhere and shoot anything as long as I didn't want to go on stage.
    But I've had other more restricted passes that limited me to only shooting during the first three songs... and then you have to stop shooting. That manager also told me that I had to be mindful of blocking the view of people in the audience... they let me walk around and even pause to take shots (knowing that for that moment I am probably blocking somebody's view) but their point was that they didn't want me to linger in any one spot... they wanted me to keep moving so that I'm not just permanently blocking someone's view.

    Most venues are dark. Some venues are ridiculously dark.

    I have a 135mm f/2 lens. Canon also makes a 200mm f/2 lens (these are not 'zoom' lenses). But these also provide shallow depth of field... SO SHALLOW that the camera can easily end up focusing on the microphone... and not the face of the person singing into the microphone. I had to be very careful to make sure I was focusing on the artist's face when shooting at f/2.

    These lenses are a little less versatile... the more versatile lens is the 70-200mm zoom... but that's an f/2.8 lens. The Canon EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM (and now version II) is easily my most-used lens.

    If you were to only get one lens... get the EF 70-200mm f/2.8L IS USM II.

    If budgets allow... I'd probably get the 135mm f/2L USM

    If you find yourself mostly shooting from a distance and you've recently won the lottery... then the EF 200mm f/2L IS USM is fantastic lens for the bargain price of just $5700 (no that's not a typo).
     
  9. hokies2379

    hokies2379 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Just shot my first concert Monday. I used my 6d and a combination of 24-105 f4 (didn’t last long) 50mm 1.8 and 70-200 2.8.

    I got my best shots with the 70-200 as there was no “pit” just GA shooting from the floor, so I went to the back, found some steps and zoomed in. I was happy, but not thrilled. I feel had I been in a traditional pit, I may have gotten better shots.

    The lighting is awful. Luckily at one point I was standing beside the lighting tech and said “hey, can you give me about 30 secs of spotlight?” Jokingly, he actually did. That was cool of him.

    I was going to upload images but the app is saying it can’t upload right now....


    Sent from my iPhone using ThePhotoForum.com mobile app
     

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