Creek under cover

Discussion in 'General Critical Analysis' started by 391615, Oct 13, 2007.

  1. 391615

    391615 TPF Noob!

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    Was almost tempted to leave the scene without shooting, but I liked the darkness of this shot, and the mystery behind where the creek goes.

    Modified 10/13/2007 1:42:12 PM
    Exposure time 1/6
    F number 22
    Exposure program Manual
    ISO speed ratings 100
    Exposure bias 0
    Metering mode Multi
    Flash Flash off
    Lens focal length 18
    Color space information sRGB
    Exposure mode Manual
    White balance Manual WB
    Focal length in 35 mm film 27
    Scene capture type Standard
    Sharpness Normal

    [​IMG]
     
  2. Ajay

    Ajay TPF Noob!

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    Lovely setting, but its overall too blurry. I think that creek is worth going back and shooting again. Were you using a tripod? You can definitely see some camera shake.
     
  3. meotter

    meotter TPF Noob!

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    the image composition isn't bad, but the exposure time might be too slow... the movement of the weed is blurry and distracting... there seems to be little reason to have such a slow shutter speed in this shot. the blurred water in this shot isn't a focus point to worry about, i'd focus more on getting the colorful foreground all sharp and it's easy to do with a quicker shutter speed. i think that softening the water in this shot actually detracts from the image.

    the bark has nice texture on the tree and the water would have equally nice texture if you had captured it with a quicker shutter.
     
  4. 391615

    391615 TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for your comments, I'm glad that I've finally got some promising signs from my shots, I know I can only get better.

    My intentions for this shot were to capture the time in the shot by the weeds flowing in the wind from a slow shutter release. I agree that it doesn't fully work. It was a dark area, I perhaps need to wait for more light on the next shot. I liked it as it had three good points of interst. I reckon I can work on it a bit more. I am going out this weekend, to redo some of those shots. I also have a few more shots to take. I'll try only to put my very best shot on this time.
     
  5. Chris of Arabia

    Chris of Arabia Herding cats since 1988... Supporting Member

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    It's a promising looking location that I think would have been better captured in different lighting conditions. As it stands at the moment, the light is very flat and there isn't really enough contrast in the scene.

    I wouldn't compromise on your chosen aperture though, you just need to pull your focal point forward a fraction more to make more of the texture in the tree front left. In brighter conditions, you could then use a faster shutter speed and freeze the 'weeds'.

    I'd also suggest cropping into a square format, losing the r/h side of the shot. Given the positioning of the tree on the right, the whole of the bank back right appears to be outside of the natural framing of the trees. There's also that fence up top which isn't really contributing much at all.

    Hope this helps - go back and get us a cracker
     
  6. skieur

    skieur TPF Noob!

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    The problem with darkness in a shot is that detail, colour, and impact are most often lost in the pursuit of that objective. The challenge is to retain these elements.

    skieur
     

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