Critique B&W

Discussion in 'Critique Forum Archives' started by PhotoHeather, Mar 18, 2007.

  1. PhotoHeather

    PhotoHeather TPF Noob!

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    I am being too brave right now. I have only had my DSLR for less than a month. Before that I had never shot or even held one. Strictly a point and shoot (using a LCD screen mind you) prior. This was shot on my fourth day of getting my camera. I am interested in B&W photography and thought advice early on is probably important. Thank you for any help anyone can provide.

    Here is my photo of an ill child:

    [​IMG]
     
  2. KrystofJ

    KrystofJ TPF Noob!

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    Well, I like it, but what did You focus on? The sweater? The eyes dont look focused to me. Also, I would like the pic to be darker (more apperture). Also, there is a lot of unused space on the top, the kid´s head could be more to the top, even a bit cut off maybe.
     
  3. PhotoHeather

    PhotoHeather TPF Noob!

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    Any other critiques? I will be shooting a newborn in the next couple days and would like some suggestions for improving.

    It seems strange with the resizing and the reduction in file size that the right eye does not seem in focus. At a 100% crop you can count each individual eyelash on the eye closest to the left-hand portion of the screen. (Kid's right). However, I will play with PS to darken it up a bit. My screen's colors have been really off since I messed around with the Adobe Gamma (?) program and cannot seem to get a good perception of what color/contrast/etc. the photos are in reality.
     
  4. shorty6049

    shorty6049 TPF Noob!

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    i think the lighting seems a little too harsh. ( i would assume you were using the built in flash??) otherwise its not bad
     
  5. PhotoHeather

    PhotoHeather TPF Noob!

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    Yeah. I used a flash. The lighting in the bedroom was ridiculously horrid and it was evening. I tried playing with the light (I have no idea about lighting yet) but the poor child was hating every minute of it (poor thing was very ill and wanted to be left alone). The other shot, following the first few I took with the flash, had external lighting but AWFUL faces (a "get that thing OUTTA MY FACE" face.) With the baby I will not be using a flash and hope that their house provides some better lighting. I will probably just bring my 50mm 1.8 just to work with available light (try to make it there there during the daylight) and not disturb the baby by blinding it.

    These are all awesome suggestions and have really got me thinking about timing/lighting/contrast etc.!

    Thanks all!
     
  6. craig

    craig TPF Noob!

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    I think you are on the right path. The white space is dreamy. The depth of field works. The lighting is slightly harsh. Spill some details and we can help further. May be the problem is that the subject is ill. Makes the shot seem uncomfortable. I know that when I am sick I do not want people near me. Let alone a camera.

    Consider some darkroom time. B&W is a lot more fun in a film environment.

    Love & Bass
     
  7. thebeginning

    thebeginning TPF Noob!

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    the flat on camera lighting, the clipped head on the left, and the seemingly pointless conversion make this shot very 'snapshottish'. here's a tip for your baby shoot, and this sounds hard, but try it....try to make every part of your photographs intentional. it forces you to realize what you're doing and see your end results easier (and also helps you to see how others will see your pictures).
     

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