Darkroom n00b

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by yashica4life, Apr 7, 2004.

  1. yashica4life

    yashica4life TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2004
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    nelson BC
    I've been into photography for about a year now, and Im startign to get serious about it. I would really like to learn how to develope my own film. Is it really expensive to setup? and What kind of stuff will I need? I know I need an enlarger and chemicals, but I dont know what kinds of chemicals and where to get them. I will be starting with black and white photos at first because I have heard that it is easier. Eventually I will be developing colours. And also is it even worth learning how to develop your own film with digital getting so popular?

    I hope some one can help me out :D

    Thanks,
    Jared
     
  2. Mitica100

    Mitica100 Moderator Staff Member Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2003
    Messages:
    9,746
    Likes Received:
    42
    Location:
    Ahwatukee, AZ
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Jared, you can find all the needed chemicals for developing Black and White at any respectable camera store. There are many on the Internet as well.

    Black and White processing seems easier than color but making the right exposure and doing the right development/printing is an art. Don't shy away from learning it, despite failures. I've had many and continue having them but I never quit.

    Someone said that Black and White photography is to Color photography what poetry is to prose.

    Learn both of them and eventually you will excel in one. Or both!

    I also think that knowing analog (regular) photography rules and formulas for exposure/processing/printing can only help you be a better digital photographer.

    Good luck!
     
  3. oriecat

    oriecat work in progress

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2003
    Messages:
    3,118
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    Portland OR USA
    Absolutely it is worth learning! It's a completely different process and way of creating the art. And it is very rewarding.

    I have never processed color, nor do I intend to, so I can't really say anything about that. I think home color processing is pretty uncommon due to it's intricateness, but I could be wrong about that...

    But for 35mm b/w film processing you would need:
    a tank and reel
    scissors
    bottle opener or cassette opener
    a place with no light to load the film, or a loading bag
    water
    thermometer
    developer
    stop bath (altho water alone can be used)
    fixer
    hypo-clear (again optional, but recommended to cut down on wash time)
    photoflo or other washing aid (again optional, but helps to cut down on water spots)
    timer

    for printing you would need:
    enlarger
    timer
    easel
    trays for chemicals (again developer, stop, fixer)
    printer washer or another tray to wash in
    tongs or gloves
    safelight

    There's lots of other stuff that is good to have, but not entirely necessary, such as
    grain focuser
    filters
    light box
    papercutter

    You'll also need dark bottles to store chemicals in, graduates for measuring... I am sure I am forgetting a lot of stuff
     
  4. yashica4life

    yashica4life TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2004
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    nelson BC
    Thanks for all the info. That sounds really expensive and complicated. I think I need someone to physically show me how to do it, or else I have a feeling there will be MANY wasted rolls of precious film...
    Thanks again
     
  5. oriecat

    oriecat work in progress

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2003
    Messages:
    3,118
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    Portland OR USA
    You should try taking a darkroom class at a community college or rental darkroom or something first, to learn the basics.
     
  6. yashica4life

    yashica4life TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2004
    Messages:
    49
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    nelson BC
    Thats an excellent plan...I dunno if the college here has anything like that tho...My highschool has a darkroom, but they don't use it anymore because the techer says his 500$ kodak digital is better than any film :roll: (he's an idiot :D )
     
  7. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    Messages:
    7,021
    Likes Received:
    34
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    1000's of home developed rolls later and i'm still amazed when I pull the film out of the dev tank and there are pictures on it. While there is definately some finesse to be learned, it's really very easy to develop your own film. Just follow Kodak or Ilford's developing instructions. About the only thing that can go wrong is if you use the chems out of order.
     
  8. Bruno

    Bruno TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    May 4, 2004
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Chicago, IL
    These are all excellent idea. I am also trying to get my own darkroom together so this is all very helpful. Even though this isn't my topic, thanks everyone for the info.
     
  9. oriecat

    oriecat work in progress

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2003
    Messages:
    3,118
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    Portland OR USA
    Welcome to our Darkroom world, Bruno. I found [ame=http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/0240802608/qid=1083871731/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_1/002-8427413-2280867?v=glance&s=books]this book[/ame] really helpful when I was pulling my darkroom together. I got a previous edition at the bookstore for like 10 bucks, it was still good, even if referring to older equipment...

    I love your avatar, it makes me smile. Is that Hertzfeld?
     

Share This Page