Day at the Museum

Discussion in 'Landscape & Cityscape' started by darkpbstar, Jun 4, 2008.

  1. darkpbstar

    darkpbstar TPF Noob!

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    I went to the Milwaukee public museum yesterday and took some pictures. I was trying to take them with no flash, but it was really hard to get the pictures to turn out, without being blurry. I used an 800 ISO setting, and an apperture of F/7. Do you guys have any recommendations with no tripod, in a museum low light setting, to get the pictures to have the lighting of the museum, without it being impossible to sit there and hold the camera while it takes 10 seconds to shoot? Thanks

    With these first two street photos (streets of Europe, inside...) One was with flash, one without. The one without makes the photo more warm feeling, and makes you feel like you are outside at night, but with the flash it just drowns out all the yellow. But without the flash, it was very hard to keep still long enough to keep a clear photo. Do you have any tips other than tripod? thank you
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    Now without flash
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    Here are some miscellaneous shots:
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    This mummy shot did not turn out well. Too blurry, but with flash it wouldn't have worked with the glass, too bad I didn't get it clear, but I will be back to that museum this summer.
    [​IMG]
     
  2. darkpbstar

    darkpbstar TPF Noob!

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    Any tips on the lighting problems I was having, as stated in original post, are greatly greatly appreciated. Thank You
    C&C Welcome!
     
  3. RKW3

    RKW3 TPF Noob!

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    Really the best way to solve your blurriness would be to get a tripod.

    If you don't have a tripod try bumping up your ISO's until you can get a shutter speed of 1/40 or more, you'll still need a steady hand though.
     
  4. MarcusM

    MarcusM TPF Noob!

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    Yep, what he said ^^^

    Your aperture is too small for this setting. You need to open it up, this should give you an extra stop or two.

    Basically I think you have 3 options:

    1. Use a tripod
    2. Open your aperture all the way
    3. Bump up your ISO all the way

    If #2 or #3 aren't enough by themselves you can combine the two.

    Edit - also, look around for anything to brace your camera against - you can lean against a wall, or if there is somewhere you can set your camera down on, you can set the timer and take a long exposure (hoping no one walks in front of the camera during the exposure)
     
  5. darkpbstar

    darkpbstar TPF Noob!

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    cool thanks. ok so smaller F/#, and/or higher ISO. THanks alot.
     

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