Debating a New Camera

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by Rewen, Jan 24, 2009.

  1. Rewen

    Rewen TPF Noob!

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    So I did some research when I switched over from Film to Digital, and I choose the Sony A200, over the Rebel Xti, WHY? you might ask! Well, it was because the A200 offered me Steady Shot built into the body, originally I had purchased the Xti first, and with the stock lens was left unhappy and decided to return it for the A20.
    So, now, a year later, I am still finding the camera settings finicky and I am feeling like I do not know what I am doing, but I know I do. My husband suggested switching cameras, as in going and getting the Xti, and upgrading.
    Now, I feel like I am starting over, I will only have the body and stock lens, and I am not sure what to get with it, I am not a rich photographer, and I find Canon very pricey.
    Any suggestions or advice?
     
  2. potownrob

    potownrob TPF Noob!

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    What do you have a hard time with on the A200? What was it you didn't like about the XTi (if you had a hard time with the controls or ergonomics of both the Sony and Canon, maybe Nikon will work better for you)? What do you find so expensive about the Canon line? I think the bodies are priced aggressively for what you get (especially the older models like the XT and XTi) and, from what I've read, you can get decent quality (not pro but also not junk build quality and IQ) standard zoom and telephoto zoom Canon EF-S IS and Canon fixed length lenses for around 200 USD and less. You could also consider crossing over to the dark side and going Nikon. :greendev:
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2009
  3. Stranger

    Stranger TPF Noob!

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    If you have had the camera for a year and are still "finicky" with it i would call user error. The A200 is capable of producing very nice images. If you are having a gard time with the settings I would recommend a book on your camera. The field guides are generally nice. If not, you could try switching systems but it will be just as tricky.

    The field guides are only a fraction of what a new system would cost you. So might be worth it.

    Like pot said, what is it you find complicated with your camera?
     
  4. dxqcanada

    dxqcanada Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Based on your experience with the Sony A200 ... what would you like to change ?

    If you are not handling the many settings/functions on the Sony as opposed to a simplier Film SLR ... then you will find that most DSLR's are like that.

    My wife and I have the Sony A100.
    She shoots in Program + Raw.
    I shoot in Shutter / Aperture priority + RAW most of the time.

    We do not fiddle with the other settings since we shoot RAW.

    My wife has no problem with the Auto settings as she is used to the Minolta Maxxum cameras.
    I came from a Canon nF-1 ... and I sorrily miss the manual exposure setup in that camera (DSLR's are not really targetted at manual users).
     
  5. Dagwood56

    Dagwood56 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I have had a Sony A100 since November 08, and at first i was having a hard time with it. Suggestions from people here and practice [makes perfect], and a lot of time in the evening reading through the users manual, plus the lantern guide for the A100, I have learned quickly how to set and reset almost everything.

    I did find, as I shoot jpeg's rather than raw, that turning the camera's built in DR [in camera processing] OFF has helped greatly in the overall appearance of the shots. I can now make minor adjustments in photo shop and come out with a decent photo.

    As dxqcanada said above - "If you are not handling the many settings/functions on the Sony as opposed to a simplier Film SLR ... then you will find that most DSLR's are
    like that." changing brands probably won't help much.

    Hang in there and read, read, read, the manuals and practice till you get it right. Good luck.
     
  6. Rewen

    Rewen TPF Noob!

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    Ok,
    So, my issue I guess could be user error, I wasn't fully taught all of the ins and outs of how to shoot manual or aperture/shutter priority, just auto. I was assured I would just 'figure it out'...... well, a few years later with a gone through a few cameras, I am having this issue. It makes me feel dumb :( but ok. When I shoot manual, I am finding I waste alot of time adjusting my shutter and aperture, which i find frustrating, I still haven't mastered the sunny 16 rule, which is equally frustrating.
    I have never been great at math, but as soon as I think I figure it out on paper, I pick up my camera and POOF all that information is gone, and i feel flustered and confused.
    I have been shooting since I was a kid, and I never thought i'd find it so depressing to want to avoid my camera because I don't want to shoot in auto, but in manual, but have to spend a few minutes every time the light changes to figure out what f.stop to be at, and to get a clear picture.
    Now, the reason i wasn't happy with the XTi was because I found some of my shots out of focus when i blew them up, but when they were small they were fine, I had done some prenatal shots for a friend, but i woudl never sell them to a paying client, i was pretty unhappy. Call that user error if you'd like, but Im not completely incompetant.
    I am finding the A200 increasingly frustraiting because I can't adjust the aperture and shutter speed easily, i've looked at all the manuals, and call me blind, but I can't find an easier way then navigating through several menus. Frustraiting.
    I know this is long winded, but oh well. Thank you everyone for all your advice, maybe this might help explain my confusion a bit.
     
  7. frXnz kafka

    frXnz kafka TPF Noob!

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    I'm not sure about the A200, but with the XTi you have to hold a button and turn the one control wheel to change your aperture. You should make sure your A200 doesn't do this before switching cameras.

    If you do decide to switch, I would recommend something with two control wheels. You can get a used Canon 20D or 30D very cheap right now. The picture quality will be roughly the same as the XTi, and the ergonomics will be much better.
     
  8. JustAnEngineer

    JustAnEngineer TPF Noob!

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    Rather than jumping straight out of the green box mode to "M", why not start with "P", then move on to "A" (and rarely "T")?
     
  9. dxqcanada

    dxqcanada Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    I would also suggest you shoot in Aperture or Shutter priority.

    In Aperture priority you control the lens aperture (which changes depth of field) and the camera balances the shutter speed.

    In Shutter priority you control the shutter speed (which changes motion blur) and the camera balances the shutter speed.


    Shooting in manual usually means that you are adjusting the exposure away from the camera's progammed exposure.
    If you shoot in manual by setting the Shutter speed and then setting the Aperture until you balance to a 0 value ... then you are not really using manual exposure. You are in fact manually setting auto exposure ... which can be accomplished using A or S or even P modes.

    I will only shoot manual exposure when I know that the camera's exposure system will not be the correct one ... and I have the knowledge to be able to compensate manually.

    With the out of focus images ... there could be different reasons for that:
    - poor quality lens
    - camera shake due to shutter speed
    - focusing problems under low light
    - noise cause by high ISO
     

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