Depth of Field, Hyperfocal with AF

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by robc638, May 12, 2009.

  1. robc638

    robc638 TPF Noob!

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    On my camera / lens there is no way to tell where the depth of field limits are. When shooting outdoor scenes, the camera will automatically set the lens to infinity and I have no way of determining hyperfocal distances. Is there a way to do this?

    Nikon D60
    Nikon 18-55 f/3.5-5.6 G VR
     
  2. Dao

    Dao No longer a newbie, moving up!

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  3. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    Unfortunately the D60 does not have a DOF preview button to give you a look at the DOF..
     
  4. LarryD

    LarryD TPF Noob!

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    I am not familiar with the D60, but it should not be setting the focus "automatically" at infinity, after all, it doesn't know you are outside or not.... Shouldn't it be setting the focus on whatever focusing point you have selected.. Does the D60 allow you to choose focus points ? Focus on what you want to be in focus, hold it, recompose the scene, and finish taking the shot.

    If you want to focus on something close by, and have some control over the DOF, turn off the AF, open the f-stop up, and manually focus on your subject, then refocus slightly in front if you want the background blurred. Take the shot, and look in the preview to see if you got what you wanted.
     
  5. robc638

    robc638 TPF Noob!

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    Since the D60 does not have a DOF preview, and the lens does not have a distance scale or hyperfocal markings, it is difficult to bring forward subjects and infinity into focus: it is a hit and miss game. I was hoping someone knew a way have the camera tell me the distance so I can focus either manually, or AF.
     
  6. Dwig

    Dwig TPF Noob!

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    Its a lens issue, not a body issue. You'll have to measure the distances yourself or replace the lens with one that has a focusing scale.
     
  7. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

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    You might look through your manual for 'Rangefinder mode'. Page 116?
     
  8. LarryD

    LarryD TPF Noob!

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    Nope... camera isn't going to tell you..

    DOF will always change depending on the lens, focal length, the focusing distance, and the aperture used..

    There are some easy to carry tools though..

    Check into ExpoAperture 2
     
  9. Slaphead

    Slaphead TPF Noob!

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    This is a quick and dirty method I use:-

    Set aperture to f/16 as a starting point (I get more hits than misses with this aperture)

    Frame your shot.

    Look at the scene you've framed. About to 1/3rd of the way from the bottom of your frame is your focal point.

    Move the camera and focus on that point, return to your original frame and shoot.

    Check your result.

    As I've said this is a quick and dirty method so your milage may vary depending on scene, and you may well need to play around with the aperture and the focal point.

    In essence you should not be focusing on the most distant part of your scene rather at a point which is about 1/3 of the distance from you to the most distant part of your scene. Again this is a general rule of thumb that I use and it seems to work reasonably well.
     

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