Developing 4x5 film

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by Jeff Canes, Aug 17, 2006.

  1. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I got a 4x5 off of eBay yesterday. So how should I process the film? B&H has a Yankee day tank. Google Yankee tanks the hits cam back with some negative review about it. Thought about using trays in the dark, but would that leave undeveloped areas on film where it touches the rib of the tray? Even thought about design an extension for the plastic type reels that way I could use my 3 reel tank.
     
  2. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I've never done tray development before, but I know folks do it.

    What camera/lens did you get?

    Pete
     
  3. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I know you can get plastic reels that hold 4x5 sheets for Jobo tanks. I think each one holds 4 sheets, but a special loader is required to guide the sheets onto the reel.

    Yankee Tanks pretty much suck. If you can get one really cheap grab it, but don't spend much. I like mine for washing the film.

    Tray development is how I've been doing it for years now. I use 5x7 trays. You are pretty much contantly shuffling the sheets of film, so there is no problem with the ribs on the bottom of the tray. There is a bit of a learning curve for handling the film. I scratched some sheets at first, but eventually I figured it out. I haven't scratched a sheet in development in years.

    Another option is plastic tubes. Search for information about developing with pyro, and you'll find all sorts of clever inovations. Some folks take a short length PVC pipe, and curl the film in so the emulsion is away from the sides of the tube. Then the tube can be rolled in a bigger tray. I don't know how you do more than one sheet at a time, although I'm sure other folks have figured it out.

    You can also find dip-n-dunk sets. These are plastic tanks that are open on the top. You put the film into metal hangers which are designed to lower the film into the chems, but the handle rests on the top of the tank. You still have to do it in the dark. I got a box filled with 4x5 dip-n-dunk equipment at a garage sale for $2.50. I still like tray development better.
     
  4. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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  5. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Crown Graphic Optar 135mm f4.7 for $312 with shipping, bid on a few last week that ended up going for around $400-500, hopeful this one works out well. Ebay sometime fells like a crap shot.

    Thanks for the info Matt, the Jobo system look good to me because I don’t have a real dark room.
     
  6. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    $400-500 is too much for a Crown with Optar. The Optar is probably worth about $100, and the Crown another $200, so you paid the right price.
     
  7. Christie Photo

    Christie Photo No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Jeff... this has been hangin' around my studio for 23 years+. Buy me lunch and pay the shipping and it's all yours.

    It has six 4x5 film hangers inside. I've never used it. I suspect it would leak a bit while draining, but shoud be fine if you're working in a sink.

    It all weighs about 3 lbs (maybe 4lbs when packaged), so you can calculate the shipping from my locale... Kankakee, IL 60901.

    Pete
     

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  8. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I like the looks of that daylight tank better than my Yankee Tank. At least there's a clip to keep the top from falling off.
     
  9. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    The shipping looks to be about $8 will USPS. And about the lunch are we talk McDonald’s or a rib eye, I’ll PM my address
     
  10. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    If you dont plan to do volume I made my 4x5 tank from a plastic peanutbutter jar and some plumbing supplies. Oh yeah there was a hank of hair and piece of bone involved. It was cheap though.

    And it only uses about four ounces of chemicals that can be reused a couple of times if you want to do more than one sheet a day.
     
  11. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    If you don't already have it, Ansel Adams' book "The Negative" offers great advice on developing 4x5.
     
  12. Jeff Canes

    Jeff Canes No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I will look and see if I have it, I buy photo books and never read them :confused:
     

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