Developing film

Discussion in 'Film Discussion and Q & A' started by Shrimpy, Aug 3, 2008.

  1. Shrimpy

    Shrimpy TPF Noob!

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    I'm a bit, well actually very confused about the process of developing film at home. It's something I'd like to try, but I'm having trouble understanding the whole process. I've read up on the actual process of developing the negatives, but how do you turn the negatives into full sized pictures?

    If somebody could direct me towards a detailed guide for B&W developing and Color, it would be greatly appreciated :D
     
  2. icassell

    icassell TPF Noob!

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    Basically, an enlarger is a type of projector which projects the image from the negative onto sensitized paper (along the lines of a slide projector). You then develop the paper. :)

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enlarger

    Some people get their negatives digitally scanned and then print them on a digital printer.
     
  3. Shrimpy

    Shrimpy TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the reply!

    So the enlarger basically makes a giant negative, which you then submerge in the chemical bath?
     
  4. tkaat

    tkaat TPF Noob!

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    I would think that in the long run it would be cheaper for you to purchase a negative scanner and a good/great printer
     
  5. Shrimpy

    Shrimpy TPF Noob!

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    So I'm assuming the negative scanner automatically converts it into color or B&W?

    And also is the process the same for both B&W film and color film, aside from chemicals used?

    Sorry for all the questions! :lol:
     
  6. icassell

    icassell TPF Noob!

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    Well, the enlarger inverts the image -- turning the negative into a positive on photosensitive paper -- which you then put in the chemical bath.
     
  7. icassell

    icassell TPF Noob!

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    Cheaper, maybe (although a high-quality negative scanner can be quite pricey), but some people really enjoy the darkroom side of photography. I certainly do, but have no place or time to do it anymore. At least with photoshop, I can sit socially with my family as I work.
     
  8. Shrimpy

    Shrimpy TPF Noob!

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    Is there a noticeable difference in quality between the enlarger method vs. the scanner method?
     
  9. icassell

    icassell TPF Noob!

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    I better leave this one to the more erudite among us ...
     
  10. Steph

    Steph No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Not really. Processes are similar for colour and B&W but are done at very different temperatures. B&W films are usually developed around 20 celsius whereas developing colour is done at higher temperature. Temperature control is critical (even more so for colour) so it is quite difficult to maintain higher temperatures required for colour films without special equipment. Developing a B&W film is fairly straight forward. Here is an example of how it is done (Google for other links).
     
  11. tkaat

    tkaat TPF Noob!

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    I personally don't develop my own film but have a friend that does and he uses a film scanner.
    It comes with some software to help you
    I'm not to sure if you tell the software that comes with it that the picture is a B&W or color negative
    depending on the scanner you could also process 120 film

    If you want to understand a little more about the scanners I found this website helpful

    http://www.scantips.com/basics13.html
     
  12. Steph

    Steph No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I think you can achieve great results with both methods. Many people think that a B&W scanned negative printed with a printer does not have the same quality as a well printed silver image ('enlarger method'). Moreover, I am not so sure that the scanner/printer method would be cheaper than the enlarger method. To achieve good results with a scanner, you need a good scanner, probably a calibrated monitor and a good printer (consumable such as inks and paper are not that cheap). On the other hand enlargers are dirt cheap at the moment (have a look on eBay).
     

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