Digital Camera in sub-zero temperatures

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by yeti, Jan 18, 2008.

  1. yeti

    yeti TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Messages:
    115
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Hi all,

    I really want to take my camera on a ski-trip tomorrow, but it's going to be extremely cold: the forecast is -16C with the windchill. (This is Canada)

    I would like to do this right. What do I need to do to keep my camera, Canon EOS 40D, along with its lens working in such conditions AND bring them both back home at the end of the day just as working? Any suggestions?


     
  2. Val

    Val TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2007
    Messages:
    161
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Problem is not the temperature, but the change in temperature and condensation it brings.
     
  3. yeti

    yeti TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Messages:
    115
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I see. How can I protect my camera?
     
  4. RKW3

    RKW3 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Messages:
    1,716
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    So Cal
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I wouldn't risk a thousand dollar camera in temperatures below zero. Just me.
     
  5. 250Gimp

    250Gimp TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 3, 2006
    Messages:
    1,031
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Chelsea, Quebec
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I have used my Xt outside in -15 C weather without any problem. What I did is left the camera and lense in the bag for about 20 minutes so that it came down in temperature slowly before I used it. When I went back into the warm house I left it in the bag for about an hour so it warmed up slowly.

    It worked for me.

    I have also heard of people puting there gear in a zip lock bag for both transitions.

    Hope this helps.
     
  6. ThePup

    ThePup TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Oct 12, 2007
    Messages:
    108
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Western Australia
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    We don't get temps that cold down here, but from what I've read / heard, half the problem is the batteries don't like being that cold, and don't last as long. Apparently keeping a couple of spare batteries inside your clothing, close to your body, and cycling them regularly is the best way around it.

    The other half of the problem, as mentioned, is the condensation, and there's already suggestions around that.
     
  7. Val

    Val TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2007
    Messages:
    161
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I was skiing with D80 and battery lasted long enough for like 600-700 non-flash shots.
     
  8. yeti

    yeti TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2008
    Messages:
    115
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Yes, I am aware of the battery problem. I already read all Canon has to say about their batteries in the cold. :)

    I am worried about the lens. I have this fear that when I take my camera out tomorrow, my expensive lens will instantly crack in the cold. Sounds a bit crazy, I know.

    Still, I would rather be safe than sorry. I want to do this the right way.
     
  9. photo_guy

    photo_guy TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2008
    Messages:
    39
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    St. Thomas, Ont, Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Like the others said, keep your camera in a ziped locked bag when you are changing tempertures. I have done this before with my XTi and have had no problems. Also make sure you don't change lenses in the cold, it could cause condinsation on the sensor.
     
  10. Dubious Drewski

    Dubious Drewski TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jan 18, 2008
    Messages:
    909
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Lethbridge, Alberta, Canada
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    Some cameras seem to be able to handle the elements better than others. For instance, I've had my Konica Minolta Dimage A2 for four years and it has been in some extreme conditions. Here in Alberta, I frequently take it out in the winter cold. The only side effect is a lesser battery life. I also brought this camera to Malaysia for four months, where normal humidity is above 95% and the daytime temperature is always 30 to 40 degrees (That's over 100 degrees fahrenheit, I believe)

    I would walk out of the Hotel in the mornings and the whole camera would fog up from the inside out and I'd have to wait for about 10 minutes before I could see anything through the viewfinder. I am very impressed that even 2 years after the trip, this little thing isn't rusted up internally or malfunctioning in any way.


    So like I said, it can vary.
     
  11. Joves

    Joves No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    2,399
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    Flagstaff/Az
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I take my D80 out to play all the time. I just keep one battery in an inside pocket and, change it when the other get too cold. Then put that battery in to warm up and, use it again when the other gets too cold. When I bring the camera in I have a very large ziplock freezer bag and, the camera goes in there to aclimate the equipment in. JUst push the excess air out. Any condesation will form on the outside of the bag. I have never had a lense body crack yet.
     
  12. mrodgers

    mrodgers No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Dec 13, 2007
    Messages:
    1,662
    Likes Received:
    7
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit


    Shouldn't even have to bother with that. The air inside the bag is the same cold dry air that your camera was in while outside. It's the cold camera coming into a warm humid environment when you bring the camera back inside that is the problem. If you have the bag open and acclimated to the air outside while shooting, then you don't have to worry about removing that air as it is dry air.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
camera sub zero
,
cameras in sub zero degrees
,

digital cameras sub zero

,

digital cameras sub zero temperatures

,
digital photography sub 0 temperature
,

sub zero camera

,

sub zero cameras

,
sub zero photography
,
using a camera in sub zero temperatures
,

what happens to camera when use in subzero degree