digital collection?

Discussion in 'Collector's Corner' started by usayit, Jan 16, 2007.

  1. usayit

    usayit No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Digital cameras are more like electronics gadgets now a days... use-it-throw-it away for something better.

    Anyone here collect digital cameras? or thinking about it... etc... will they ever be collector items?

    Anyone have first hand experience with the early digital cameras of the 80's. Kodak's DSLRs based on Nikon and Canon bodies? with the huge 1.3 mp sensors and processesor units the size of a personal desktop computer?

    My oldest digital camera (still in use too) is my Canon G1 3.3 and the only digital camera I have that "might" be a collectors item someday is my Epson r-d1 (although I didn't purchase it for that reason).


    Any shoot with this first Canon still camera marketed in 1986

    http://www.canon.com/camera-museum/camera/sv/data/1986_rc701.html

    or perhaps the DCS 3.
     
  2. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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  3. Don Simon

    Don Simon TPF Noob!

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    I don't expect I'll be collecting too many compact digital cameras. Maybe I'm being pessimistic but I do agree they're mostly disposable. Not to mention mostly identical. There are exceptions of course. As the prices continue dropping I might get hold of some of the digital Olympus Mju (Stylus) models, particularly the Mju-mini aka the Verve... wonderful-looking camera in the tradition of the XA series and the original Mju/Stylus film cameras.

    As for dSLRs, I doubt I'd collect them until the prices get really low, like the levels film SLRs are currently at. The thing about dSLRs is that they're often very well-designed, fully-featured cameras, but I just don't get the same impression of them being aesthetically and mechanically timeless in the way I do with certain film cameras... digital SLRs (and digital cameras in general) however good seem to be more transient... of course that's just my psychological or emotional response and it's fairly illogical, but there you go.
     

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