Digital lenses

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by rhncue, Sep 8, 2006.

  1. rhncue

    rhncue TPF Noob!

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    I have an 8008s with a AF Nikkor 50mm 1.8, a Sigma UC zoom28-70mm 3.5-4.5 and a Sigma AF - APO 75-300mm 4.5 - 6.5 lenses. I have now bought a D-50 to get into the digital world and be able to use these lenses. I know the lenses are older but I own them.

    My question is: what is the differance between the D lenses that are being made for the digital cameras and these AF lenses other than the correction for the differance in size of the apparent magnification do to the size of the electronics in the digital camera? Inquiring minds would like to know and all that stuff.

    Thanks, Dick
     
  2. JDP

    JDP TPF Noob!

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    What you've said is about it - the DX lenses have a smaller image circle then ones for film cameras. D lenses themselves relay the distance to the subject to the camera to make matrix metering and such work.
    I think most of us Nikonians have a mix of DX and older style lenses. Most of us have the 50mm 1.8 - works like a charm :)

     
  3. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    I don't know the specifics about these particular lenses, but I've seen 3 claims that make lenses "optimized" for digital. Not all digital lenses appear to have all of these so you have to check out the specifics for each:

    1) Digital lenses for x1.6 sized digital sensors are designed to cover the smaller sensor size, rather than full frame 35mm size.

    2) Special multicoatings to help prevent chromatic abberation (purple fringing, etc...).

    3) Film emulsion is a flat surface, while every pixel on a digital camera sensor is a little bucket. With "film" lenses, particularly wide angle, the rays of light near the edges of the film/sensor are at an angle, and thins means they don't go in the bucket as well. Digital lenses cause the light to strike the sensor at less of an angle. Imagine looking at a bucket that's 15' away from you vs looking straight down into the bucket. The actual sensor pixel is the bottom of the bucket, and your eyesight are the light rays.

    I use both regular made for film lenses, and optimized for digital lenses, and I haven't noticed any difference, so who knows how much of this stuff is real, and how much is sales hype.
     
  4. JIP

    JIP No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    One other thing is that "G" lenses have no aperture ring making them impossible to use with the 8008 unless mabye using program mode if that.
     
  5. boclcown

    boclcown TPF Noob!

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    I keep hearing about this 50 mm lens...

    I don't understand. You can't zoom?

    What's the use of a lense with a fixed zoom. I've always needed to tweak the frame of a pic a bit wit a slight zoom in or out...

    Regardless, what makes the 50mm lens good?
     
  6. LWW

    LWW TPF Noob!

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    Optical quality is incredibly high.

    Price is remarkably low.

    Speed is amazingly fast.

    Weight is fantasticly low.

    Put another way it's a 1 1/3 stops faster than an 18-55 2.8 with lighter weight and better optical quality for about 10% of the price, all the while using less expensive filters.

    For that I can take a couple steps forwards/backwards.

    LWW
     
  7. Tiberius

    Tiberius TPF Noob!

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    That's what feet are for.

    The 50mm f/1.8 has better optics than any other lens under $1000, is super light-weight and very fast. There's nothing bad about it.
     
  8. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    We like 50mm prime lenses! :D Can you tell?

    Rob
     
  9. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    It does a better job resolving fine detail than zoom lenses, but other prime lenses (most under $1000) would do just as good or better. In recent Popular Photography mag lens tests the $75 Canon 50mm f/1.8 beat all Canon L zooms for resolving small detail, no matter what the price of the zoom. It wouldn't surprise me though, if other Canon primes outscored the 50mm f/1.8.
     
  10. ravikiran

    ravikiran TPF Noob!

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    Hai Guys,
    I recently bought Nikon D50 camera body. I would like to get a lens for the peice. Can you suggest me one. My use is mostly for taking pics of wildlife and landscapes. I do have a limited budget and I am looking for a novice lens set to use for a few months, which I shall upgrade later.
    Thanks,

    amiably,
    ravikiran.
     
  11. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    50mm f1.8 is probably the best quality/price tradeoff lens. Landscapes and wildlife are pretty much opposites - generally for wildlife you want a fast long zoom with wide maximum aperture, whereas for landscapes you want a wide sharp lens. The 50mm sits pretty much in the middle, so it will be a good starting point.

    Rob
     
  12. LWW

    LWW TPF Noob!

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    Assuming that you have the 18-55 kit lens, go and pick up a Nikkor 55-200 zoom and a 50 i.8 and you have everything from a fairly wide angle to a fairly long telephoto with a low light indoor/outdoor mild telephoto. If you spent $300.00 on this setup you might be paying too much, and you can buy them 1 at a time.

    LWW
     

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