Digital MILC And Digital RangeFinder?

Discussion in 'Mirrorless Cameras' started by holgalomography, Jul 23, 2016.

  1. holgalomography

    holgalomography TPF Noob!

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    I've been searching for the difference between a Digital MILC and a Digital RangeFinder Camera for weeks. BUT. Still unable to find any firm answer. Please help you guys. Thank You For Your Time And Have A Nice Day ;-)


     
  2. holgalomography

    holgalomography TPF Noob!

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    Are they the exact same thing? Just one with a fancier name?
     
  3. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    No and Yes. MILC = Mirrorless Interchangeable Lens Camera

    There are many MILC's from different manufactures. The more popular MILC's are produced by:
    Sony, Olympus, Panasonic, Fuji, Leica, Canon and Nikon.

    Most MILC's use an Electronic View Finder for focusing. An EVF is like a little video screen in the viewfinder. Some of the less expensive MILC's only use the back LCD to focus and frame.

    A 'Rangefinder' is a particular type of Optical Focusing System. Only one digital camera manufacturer, that I am aware, matches a digital camera with a true rangefinder focusing system, Leica.

    Fuji makes two cameras, X100T and X-Pro2, which uses a hybrid rangefinder focusing system. Fuji combines an optical viewfinder with an electronic overlay. While not a true rangefinder, it comes damn close to a rangefinder experience. Those two Fuji cameras can also switch between an EVF and Optical with Electronic Overlay.

    Many photographers consider the Canon and Nikon MILC offerings to be inferior to Sony, Olympus, Panasonic, Fuji and Leica.
     
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  4. holgalomography

    holgalomography TPF Noob!

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    Thanks. I have managed to understand albeit only a little bit. I guess to really understand I really have to get my hands on them Leicas. The truth though who can afford a Leica in this economy. Definitely not an amateur like MESELF.
     
  5. holgalomography

    holgalomography TPF Noob!

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    Oh yes. In this case what is the opinion of a photography pundit like yourself on which type is superior if I may ask?
     
  6. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    There are many 'vintage/classic' film rangefinders which are nearly free when compared to a Leica. But the cheaper rangefinders typically come with a 'fixed' lens.
     
    Last edited: Jul 25, 2016
  7. Gary A.

    Gary A. Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    It is all a matter of personal preference. Rangefinders are a manual focusing system, so comparing rangefinder with a modern AF system is sorta like apples and oranges. But comparing a manual rangefinder to a manual 'Split Image' Through The Lens focusing system both are equally accurate, the TTL is probably a bit faster in good light, the rangefinder is a bit faster in low light. (Again, it is dependent upon the skill and preference of the photog.) Typically, the rangefinder shows what is outside the frame, which many photogs regard as advantageous. A good TTL shows a bit less than 100% of the capture frame. Rangefinders have limited focal length range of about 28mm to 135mm, anything longer or wider requires a special viewfinder adapter which clips into the hot shoe. Unlike a TTL system, viewing through a rangefinder is like looking through a window, everything is in focus all the time. There is a little red/yellow transparent patch in the middle of the window which reflects a 'ghost image'. As you focus the red/yellow ghost image will move left or right, when the red/yellow ghost image lines up precisely over the window image of what you want in-focus ... it is focused. An EVF, is TTL and the photog can go from fisheye to 1000+mm with no other considerations than simply switching out the lens. EVF's not only show DOF, but they can also be set to show exposure. If you are underexposed, the EVF will be dark, if you are overexposed, then the EVF will be overly bright. Or you can set the EVF to auto adjust and regardless of the lighting conditions, the EVF will adjust for a proper viewing of your subject. The biggest drawback to a EVF is the fraction of a second 'blackout' after every shutter release. This isn't noticeable unless you're shooting multiple frames per second in Continuous mode. Then it become hard to follow the subject if they are moving. Because a rangefinder does not show DOF, the photog has to previsualized the image or constantly chimp in order to get a feel of the image they have captured.

    There is nothing magical about a rangefinder, between 28mm to 135mm it is just different. Beyond 28mm and 135mm, it becomes different bad.

    I used to shoot news back in the film only days. For a short spell I shot motorized Leicas ... Just to be different. Typically, a rangefinder is a much smaller package, camera and lenses, than an equilivent SLR. For me, the shortcomings of a rangefinder and even the moniker of the "cool guy with the Leicas", was not enough to keep me a convert and after about half a year I switched back to Nikon.

    There is much more info I can toss out, but between 28mm and 135mm, for most photogs it is more a personal preference than anything else. If you're in SoCal, I'd be happy to let you play with my Fuji's and I could probably dig up a Leica.
     
  8. gsgary

    gsgary Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Epson came out with the first true digital rangefinder, the RD1 it used a Nikon D70 sensor and Voigtlander body you had to cock the shutter by winding it on like film, I still want one
    Epson R-D1 - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Sent from my SM-G903F using Tapatalk
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    Last edited: Jul 27, 2016
  9. gsgary

    gsgary Been spending a lot of time on here!

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