Digital v's film

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by sixty6, Jul 22, 2008.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. sixty6

    sixty6 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2008
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi all,
    If this post has been covered before, please excuse me and direct me to it. I'm after the pros and cons of digital pictures versus film pictures. I'm looking to buy an SLR and am not sure what direction to go in. Also, if this post belongs in another section, feel free to direct me.
    Thanks.
     
  2. Battou

    Battou No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 10, 2007
    Messages:
    7,997
    Likes Received:
    26
    Location:
    Slapamonkey, New York
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
  3. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2008
    Messages:
    7,274
    Likes Received:
    406
    Location:
    Shepherdsturd, WV / Almost, MD
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    After the initial purchase, digital will be cheaper and more effective for a beginner. While the quality may not be the same, not having a dark room and having to go to Wal Mart to have them develop the film without having the ability to do any processing to it can be a pain. But hey, if you have the room and supplies for a darkroom, but a cheap Mamiya MF camera and some lenses and go have some fun.
     
  4. Zansho

    Zansho TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2008
    Messages:
    76
    Likes Received:
    0
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    >.>; Digital is already catching up (and in some cases) surpassing film in quality. Digital has much better ISO performance noise wise, instant gratification, no "developing costs," among other things.

    The only reason why I'd use film is for a 4x5 negative (large format camera) and maybe medium format negative and scan those. My 5D can beat output from any 35mm SLR camera any day of the week.

    Only way I'd consider film is large format. That's pretty much it.
     
  5. Robin

    Robin TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 29, 2008
    Messages:
    119
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Salford Quays, Manchester, UK
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I agree, since I've gone digital I would only ever use film if I was pulling out my 4x5. I also agree that without the use of a dark room, you would have more control over post processing with digital than film.
     
  6. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2005
    Messages:
    5,454
    Likes Received:
    41
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    In medium format film there's little comparison quality wise for the vast majority of digital cameras. Perhaps not a fair fight, but for example at my last shoot, I was shooting 645 film and another photographer was shooting with a D200. His RAW files at the same magnification look pretty awful compared to my negative scans.
     
  7. sabbath999

    sabbath999 No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Apr 11, 2007
    Messages:
    2,694
    Likes Received:
    61
    Location:
    Missouri
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I don't doubt you are right when looking at the scans in high magnification... but that doesn't necessarily translate into a lot better print quality unless you go BIG.

    Absolutely, medium format with big scans will beat a D200 hands down when looking at each 100 percent. But... in the terms of real world prints, the difference is pretty hard to spot.
     
  8. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2005
    Messages:
    5,454
    Likes Received:
    41
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Well lucky for me I go big. And As far as I'm concerned there are times when the difference is visible in a 9x12. Think of it this way. Every step up in sensor/negative size gets a little closer to a contact print. Even in a smaller print, if I can see the difference btw 35mm and MF, I can certainly see it between APS-C and MF.
     
  9. icassell

    icassell TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2008
    Messages:
    9,893
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Arizona
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I gave away all my 35mm stuff recently because I just wasn't using it. Hours hidden away in a darkroom to get the print I wanted was very antisocial -- at least I can do PS in my living room and, frankly, it is alot less expensive to experiment and make mistakes. The instant gratification of the digital format also makes for a quicker learning curve (see what you did wrong and try it the right way -- rather than waiting for images to come back and then trying to figure out how to correct what you were doing wrong).

    I'm not disparaging those who still do and love film, but if I were to choose only one or the other (which I did), I'd go digital every time.
     
  10. Alpha

    Alpha Troll Extraordinaire

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2005
    Messages:
    5,454
    Likes Received:
    41
    Location:
    San Francisco
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    You might also consider what a nightmare it can be to properly back up and secure your digital images, especially after you've been shooting for a while. Further, you have long-term storage media and compatibility to consider. Whereas with film, you just need some negative pages and binders.
     
  11. randerson07

    randerson07 TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    279
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Pingree Grove, Illinois
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I find it to be personal preference, Yeah todays high end DSLR's produce some super sharp images at really high ISOs with little to no noise. But film has a look and feel all its own.

    If your looking to take good pictures get a DSLR, if you want high ISO performace and ease of use get a DSLR, if your looking for quick turnaround and instant gratification get a DSLR, and so on

    If you want to really enjoy photography and take your time setting up shots(you only get about 36 shots a roll, not 100's per memory card), and you think you might one day like to develop your own or do wet prints or shoot medium and large format, or you just want to be different, then go film.

    Film and Digital are different forms to achieve a common goal, they each have a look and feel all their own. You really have to experience each of them to really get an understanding and decide which you prefer.

    Personally im on a film kick, just started developing and scanning my own Black and Whites, I have a slide projector and also shoot slide film. Its really rekindled photography as a hobby for me, without finding film(I never in my life used a film camera before March of this year unless you count disposables) I probably wouldnt still be into photography.
     
  12. Joves

    Joves No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    Dec 14, 2007
    Messages:
    2,399
    Likes Received:
    21
    Location:
    Flagstaff/Az
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    The other thing I love about Dslrs is you are not stuck in one ISO, when you are out shooting. With film one you load a roll you are stuck till you shoot the whole roll.
     
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.

Share This Page