DIY Lighting

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by ferox femina, Apr 6, 2008.

  1. ferox femina

    ferox femina TPF Noob!

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    So, naturally I prefer sunlight to artificial lighting.

    After doing some research on the web, I decided to go a DIY way instead of shelling out a lot of $$$. I have 3 clamp lights, w/ CF full spectrum light bulbs. I also have a reflector, and white poster board.

    I use a portable clothes closet as my rig for backgrounds (which, I only have one of, to be honest).

    I'm having trouble getting the best of my lighting, though. Is there a correct way for positioning these lights? I usually try one slightly behind me and above my head for backlighting. Then two off centered in front of me.

    I don't feel like I'm getting the best of my lighting, especially when I'm trying to capture my eyes.

    May I get some tips/suggestions please? :)
     
  2. JerryPH

    JerryPH No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    If you do a search you will see that this comes up quite often. It is possible to get a setup that includes off camera flash, an optical trigger and a lightstand for under $120, and the results will be far superior to these "hardware store constant-on" lighting kits (www.strobist.com for all the info you need about that).

    That said, why don't you post an example of the issues you are having?

    There are dozens of methods and techniques to get different results based on your needs. Methods from open loop to closed loop to Rembrant to Broad to short to Broadway and on and on and on! :D

    I prefer simple. One strobe on a 6-ft high light stand shooting down at about 30 degrees to camera right. It is simple and effective:

    [​IMG]
     
  3. ferox femina

    ferox femina TPF Noob!

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    I wish I had some examples, but I do not.

    I went and did some searching, and found this guy who's just fantastic. After reading his softbox DIY - I wonder - if doing portraits, is this something I should make for each on of my lights?

    I feel as though I always see the standard two umbrella lights, so why not make two of those? Would it work, or am I reaching here?
     
  4. Village Idiot

    Village Idiot No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    It really depends on what you're shooting. Using two lights and crossing them up will leave your lighting looking flat.

    Plus if you're talking about putting them on a work light, be careful of the heat and fir hazards. I had a DIY light box I put together for like $20 with the Home Depot work lights, but they got so hot that I didn't feel comfortable with leaving them on for more than 5 minutes at a time. Plus I was sweating like a large hairy beast by the time I got done from all the heat they were emitting.
     
  5. ferox femina

    ferox femina TPF Noob!

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    It's just a clamp light (w/ a silver bowl), with a CF full spectrum light bulb. No Tungsten or the like. :D
     
  6. Mike_E

    Mike_E No longer a newbie, moving up!

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