Do i Need a filter?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Booshka, Feb 8, 2006.

  1. Booshka

    Booshka TPF Noob!

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    Was out today taking some snaps, a couple pics were in the direction of the sun which was low in the sky, when i got home i noticed that the ground area was extremely dark while the sky was perfectly exposed and some were the opposite way round, i.e great ground area and blown sky. Do i need a filter of some kind so that you get both exposed well?

    Thanks for any help.
     
  2. DestinDave

    DestinDave Master of Non Sequitur

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    Several things you can try. As far as filters go, a graduated neutral density filter will block light from one side but not the other so using such a filter to block out the bright sky could help. Also, a split filter which has a hard line between a darkening side and a clear side. Problem here is you have to place the line pretty much on the horizon or the break point between light and dark. I would normally try to meter the whole scene, then open up 1 to 2 stops. This will bring in more detail in the shadows but shouldn't blow out the highlights.
    You don't say if you were shooting digital or film and if film, whether color, b&w, or transparencies. B&W has a lot higher latitude for overexposure than color.
     
  3. Booshka

    Booshka TPF Noob!

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    Sorry for not mentioning, it's digital in colour and thank you for those filter ideas i'll look into them.

    Cheers.
     
  4. Rob

    Rob TPF Noob!

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    Don't forget with digital, that you can put the camera on a tripod and take two pictures, one exposed for the sky and the other for the ground and overlay them, using the a transparant blend to make a perfectly exposed picture.

    Rob
     
  5. cjoe

    cjoe TPF Noob!

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    Good idea ^

    If you ever have this problem with film then you will need a graded neutral filter or you can use, the zone system when you are printing. Who was saying that Ansel Adams wasn't great? :)
     
  6. Booshka

    Booshka TPF Noob!

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    :hail: I hadn't thought of that, thank you very much.
     

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