do i need something special to photo waterfalls

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by polock, May 11, 2008.

  1. polock

    polock TPF Noob!

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    I love how in certain pictures, long exposure is used to make the water run together. problem is every time I have tried to do this with my point and shoot, I always way over expose it. Now that I have a DSLR, what do I need so I can take these cool pics.
     
  2. bikefreax

    bikefreax TPF Noob!

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    Either take the picture in the early morning or in the evening to be able to use a slower shutter speed to get the right exposure. Also you need a Neutral Density filter which stops the image down to help.
     
  3. iriairi

    iriairi TPF Noob!

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    Can't imagine not using a tripod or polarizer for shooting waterfalls...
     
  4. bikefreax

    bikefreax TPF Noob!

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    OOPS forgot about the tripod.
     
  5. rmh159

    rmh159 TPF Noob!

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    Yeah a tripod and a ND filter are must haves. You might be able to skip the ND filter if you're shooting in low enough light but having it will give you FAR more control over the shutter speed.

    The polarizer is a good idea too but you can get the shot without it.
     
  6. Overread

    Overread has a hat around here somewhere Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I agree - the 2 things you most definatly can't do this without are:
    Tripod
    evening/morning light

    the rest is a good bonus and will give you greater control over the shot, but is not essential.
    Then you need to go into the shutter priority mode on your camera and from there set a slower shutter speed - and from there is playing around with the shutter speeds to get the result you are after. I would also suggest shooting in RAW mode, that way you can alter the exposure after the shot is taken, giving you more control and also a chance to use a much slower shutter speed
     
  7. polock

    polock TPF Noob!

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    well i have a tripod and i already plan on getting a polarizer so i guess pretty much you have to shoot these before sunrise or after sunset to really get a good exposure from what i am reading. I am going on a hike in gulf hagas next weekend up here in Maine and I was hoping there was a type of filter that would allow for daytime shooting. but maybe we can stay late.
     
  8. RyanLilly

    RyanLilly No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    You can use a neutral Density filter, to reduce the light and shoot during the day.
     
  9. Miaow

    Miaow TPF Noob!

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    As I don't currently have a ND filter I find when I do long exposures ( I tend to do them more at sunset so there's less light) that I usually use Manual so I can set both the shutter speed slower and use a High F appeture value (smaller appeture) which will drop a lot of light. I also tend to have the ISO lower to reduce how sensitive it is to light also. Polarising filters will also drop the light levels a little as well.

    *Edited* Yes and a Tripod's a necessary (as previous people have said ) :)
     
  10. m1a1fan

    m1a1fan TPF Noob!

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    As everyone has stated, a sturdy Tripod w/good head, Remote Shutter Release, Polarizer and Neutral Density Filters. I carry .9 and 1.8 B+W Neutral Density filters.

    Sunrise and sunsets are best as are very cloudy days (my favorite).
     
  11. Joves

    Joves No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    I use a Hoya 8.0 ND filter and, tripod. Also using f-stops at f/11 or smaller. Also I like to use ISO 100 or 200. Depends on how long of an exposure you want. I shot this one at ISO 100, f/11 and at 1/4 of a second. It was shot at about 2 PM. If this is the effect you are looking for.
    [​IMG]
     
  12. rmh159

    rmh159 TPF Noob!

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    I run into this as well since some of the hikes I wouldn't want to do in the dark. You can shoot them in the day but you'll need the ND filter others have mentioned or a VERY cloudy day.
     

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