Do I take the plunge?

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by nealjpage, Jan 27, 2007.

  1. nealjpage

    nealjpage multi format master in a film geek package

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    I'd just gotten my cart full at Freestyle, and was ready to finish my order when the little devil popped up on my shoulder and told me to order an E6 kit. I'm usually not very good at ignoring this fellow, but I bargined enough with him to let me ask you all about slide processing before I invest the cash in it. Freestyle carries the Arista E6 three-bath kit, as opposed to the Kodak multi-bath kit. Does the three bath work as well? Has anyone used it? What's the consensus on it? It seems simpler than the Kodak-style multi-baths at less cost. I can still get a 36 exposure roll processed and mounted for $7, but I'd like to try it myself. I'm pretty good at B & W. Waddya all think?
     
  2. ksmattfish

    ksmattfish Now 100% DC - not as cool as I once was, but still

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    E6 is a standardized development process that was specifically designed to be used with large, automated, lab processing machines. I don't see any advantages in doing it yourself, and there are several disadvantages that come to mind: costs more, exposure to toxic chems, no chance of doing a better job than a machine, plenty of chances to do a worse job.... The reasons I can think of developing E6 at home are: curiosity, the pride in doing it yourself, it's a photo class assignment, or there isn't decent E6 lab processing available.

    To me the main reason to do BW development in my home darkroom is the extra control and options I have compared to lab machine processing. I don't see this with E6. You are going to be doing your best to duplicate the lab machine. You may get interesting results varying the process, but they'll probably be less than optimal.

    Anyway, my 2 cents.
     
  3. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    If you shoot a lot of E6 and don't like your local lab choices, and enjoy doing these processes yourself, then go for it. I can't give you a comparison for the three-bath process over the multi-bath, so you're on your own there. ;)

    OTOH, it wouldn't make a whole lot of sense if you're not shooting a ton of E6. You might think about the impact this may have on the time spent on your B&W development. Think hard before you encroach on that. If it gets to be too much, it might come to seem more like a chore and less like the joy of creative freedom. I've no doubt you could do it....but do you really need to?

    Once you decide on that, it should be easier to make a choice.
     
  4. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    I had a heck of a time getting some 120 slides processed, so of course I rushed out and bought their e6 kit. I sits on my shelf in the box unopened to this day and that was bout two years ago.

    When it got time to really do it, it just sounded like too much work and hassle for me. Probably not for you.
     
  5. DocFrankenstein

    DocFrankenstein Clinically Insane?

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    I hardly shoot BW anymore... let alone develop my own slide. It's too impractical for me.
     
  6. nealjpage

    nealjpage multi format master in a film geek package

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    Did you buy the three-bath kit from Arista?
     
  7. mysteryscribe

    mysteryscribe TPF Noob!

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    Yes I did, but one of the bottle leaked in transport so I dont have a full kit anyway.

    It sounded real easy till I got to looking at the temperature controll and what I would do with the chemicals after I did the first roll since I shoot slides so seldom


    I have a couple of bricks of slide film 120 I shot one roll from. Someday.
     
  8. Majik Imaje

    Majik Imaje TPF Noob!

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    Well after reading this thread through a couple of times.. carefully

    this is what I have to offer and it is only MY opinion.

    IT IS UP TO YOU: if you want to process and learn how to process.

    to some people it is not worth the effort, impracticle and I agree, but for me it wasn't impracticable ? I loved learning how to process, COLOR..

    and I will agrue anyday over AS GOOD OR BETTER than a machine can do.

    a machine just has the film in the solution for the same time as you would.

    YOU ACHIEVE SPECTACULAR results and temp control is a snap very easy to accomplish.

    a three bath kit over Kodak is bound to be easier but I trust no one but Kodak. I LEARNED THE HARD WAY. too many times.

    I use Kodak all the way. nothing but the best. They have the most consistent manufacturing methods for film, paper, chemisty, than anyone.

    The are perhaps the oldest. but to me they are the best!

    E-6 processing is no thrill, it is precise, demanding, and time consuming.

    Other wise it is a very boring process.

    I am sure you would much rather be out doing something else that sitting starring at a timer and thermomer and agitating a film cannister with wet hands! then they have to dry and you have to mount them.. it is just not worth all the effort you have to put into it.

    COLOR NEGATIVES;.. WELL now.. there is a different story altogether.!

    http://majikimaje.com/drkrm15.jpg
     

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