Dripping tap and fast shutter speed

Discussion in 'General Gallery' started by DwainDibley, Jul 26, 2007.

  1. DwainDibley

    DwainDibley TPF Noob!

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    I've had a go at freezing the motion of water droplets out of a tap, as I love those kinds of shots! Used the camera on full manual, they are a bit dark but thought that added to the effect. Taken using my Canon EOS 300D and 50mm f1.8 lens.

    Taken at a fairly fast shutter speed (1/640, ISO 100, f1.8), though not quite frozen the water!

    [​IMG]

    Taken at a slightly faster shutter speed than the previous picture (1/800, ISO 100, f1.8) has very nearly frozen the water droplets!

    [​IMG]

    Looking for more C&C on these, any comments on how I could improve! Perhaps I could have increased the ISO to 200 or 400 to get a faster shutter speed to really freeze the droplets?
     
  2. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    Use a flash to freeze the movement of the water. You'll never achieve sharp results at f/1.8. You need some depth of field to get all of the water in focus. You'll also get a better exposure. These are dull and underexposed. Give yourself a plain background. If you can, hang a sheet or towel behind to give some contrast.
     
  3. DwainDibley

    DwainDibley TPF Noob!

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    Cheers for the feedback Matt! I did try to compose the shot so that those two out of focus jugs kind of framed the shot, not sure if it worked though!

    I didn't use the flash as I didn't think you could use the flash effectively at higher shutter speeds (except for effect), I think the fastest shutter speed I can get with my 300D with the flash is something like 1/125. I only currently have the small pop-up flash currently sadly!

    Will have another go probably tomorrow using the flash and will try at f4 or somewhere thereabouts and see what I come up with, though I may have to increase the ISO to get the fast shutter speeds. I'll see if I can drape something behind the shot too.
     
  4. Vaporous

    Vaporous TPF Noob!

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    I would set your shutter speed as high as the camera will allow and set your flash to rear curtain. I think thats pretty much what I did when I attemped water shots.
     
  5. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    You don't need a fast shutter speed with a flash. The flash duration is so short that it will freeze the action.
     
  6. skieur

    skieur TPF Noob!

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    I would use a flash too and as Matt said it freezes the action but I would also use velvet in the background since it does not reflect light. I went to a materials store and picked up a good sized piece of black velvet to use as a background.

    skieur
     
  7. DSLR noob

    DSLR noob TPF Noob!

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    Yeah I found if I set my tabletop fan to the highest setting and used my XT's built-in flash, the blades would freeze with flash even at 1/15 (very slight ghosting) everything above 1/60 was tack sharp, and to get the same results without flash I turned on REALLY bright lights and got the shutter speed to 1/2000
     

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