DSLR in Extreme Cold

Discussion in 'Digital Discussion & Q&A' started by ZipperZ, Feb 8, 2010.

  1. ZipperZ
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    ZipperZ New Member

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    So I am going to Churchill Manitoba Canada, for those of you who don't know it is in the Arctic. I will be there for 10 days in a tent with work. I will not be coming inside the whole time. I should mention this will be with the Canadian Forces and it is not uncommon to have your bag thrown around and it will never come in the tent.

    I want to bring my camera because there are amazing northern lights up north and if I see a polar bear in the wild I want a damn good pic. I will bring my simple point a shoot for sure however going to the arctic is something I don't know if I ever will do again and I want to bring my good camera.

    Do I have to be worried about my camera and lenses in extreme cold? I can warm my batteries in the my coat and tent. It is a Sony a200 I should add, along with several lenses.

    Do you think I should risk bringing my camera?
  2. Joves
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    Joves New Member

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    Not sure about the Sonys but, I would attempt to atleast get the body inside the tent. If not all you can do is take the batteries out and, keep them warm. I would try and keep the camera as padded as possible not only because, of getting buped around but to protect it from possible frosting. But as I said try to get it in the tent if you take it.
  3. Big
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    Big New Member

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    Lucky! That would be so cool to experience! From what I heard, just keep the batteries warm.
  4. molested_cow
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    molested_cow Well-Known Member

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    Ha, I'd be willing to sacrifice my gears for this experience plus once-a-life-time photos.

    You can always buy your gears back... some day.
  5. Big Mike
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    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member

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    Welcome to the forum.

    The biggest issue will likely be the batteries. Cold temps kill batteries, so you will need to warm them up, and likely need a way to charge them often.

    The camera itself should be OK...unless we are talking about extremely cold temps like -40 or -50 Celsius.

    One thing to be aware of, is condensation. If you bring a cold object into a warn/humid environment, condensation will form on the cold surface. So keep your camera gear sealed up when you take it from the cold into a warm vehicle or building etc.
  6. billygoat
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    billygoat New Member

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    Is there any chance you can charge batteries in a vehicle?? I work in wildlife and spend a lot of time in the outdoors, but usually have a truck to stash gear. I worry about my gear in both the heat and the cold, but haven't "tested" my dslr that much yet. . .I'd like to know how it turns out. . .Good luck.
  7. srinaldo86
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    srinaldo86 New Member

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    I don't know how cold it gets up there but I would definitely say it is worth the risk of taking your camera for such a unique and rare opportunity. My suggestion if you're really concerned is to stock up on these...

    [​IMG]
    Place them in your bag near your camera, probably not in direct contact. They get heated up BIG TIME, Toe warmers are A LOT warmer than hand warmers. They are air activated and will remain warm for a long time, but will be HOT for an hour or so.

    You might want them for your camera, but you might really want them for your feet/hands. :p

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