Dust in water, glomming on to emulsion

Discussion in 'The Darkroom' started by Bobby Ironsights, Nov 22, 2007.

  1. Bobby Ironsights

    Bobby Ironsights TPF Noob!

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    Hey, I've been reading about avoiding dust on the emulsion, a persistent problem for me.

    Apparently, I've been told, dust that will not come off, no matter how hard you blow with canned air or dust with antistatic cloth, is usually embedded in the emulsion from either dust in the chemical water, or the rinse water.

    Does anyone here use a filter, I can't find anyone in north america who carries the paterson water filter specifically for rinse water.
     
  2. Helen B

    Helen B TPF Noob!

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    Particles that get onto the emulsion while it is wet are likely to stay there.

    I used to take a Durst filter with me on my travels as a matter of routine. Here in NYC we occasionally have some rusty stuff in the water, but most of the time filtration isn't necessary. I use distilled or deionised water for making up developers and for the final rinse.

    Arkay make a lot of water filters for darkroom use. B&H sell them, and they also sell the Paterson one ($17.50) as well as Leedal and the more expensive Delta units.

    Best,
    Helen
     
  3. doobs

    doobs TPF Noob!

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    Get new water without dust in it. :/
     
  4. kaiy

    kaiy TPF Noob!

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    I think that airborne dust sticking to your drying negative would be more of a problem than "dusty" water. Dry your film in a dust free, or as dust free you can make it, environment. For a water filter, you should be able to find an inline filter at your local home improvement store.
     
  5. Bobby Ironsights

    Bobby Ironsights TPF Noob!

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    I did, in the form of a brita water filter, you wouldn't beleive the difference in sediment.

    The thing is, Thunder Bay doesn't treat its water AFAIK, the benefit of living far north is relatively clean water, except for seasonal pollen, winter runoff, etc..etc...all safe for human consumption, all bad for film.
     

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