E-6 life?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by selmerdave, Jul 15, 2005.

  1. selmerdave

    selmerdave TPF Noob!

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    Since I have been shooting slide film for only a couple of years I am looking for comments from those who have shot for a long time. I keep hearing about the lifespan of E-6 transparencies (after processing), or lack of it. I tend to prefer Kodachrome at the moment and it is well known for it's life, but with it's ineviteable demise I wonder about the E-6 films. Is it a bit of fiction that they don't last that long or am I likely to find an unpleasant surprise 15 years after I shoot some important memories? What do people do to address this issue, surely pro's that are fond of Velvia don't accept a definite lifespan.

    Dave
     
  2. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    A lot depends upon how you store them, but this goes for all photographic material.
    I have some Ektachrome I shot over 25 years ago and it's fine.
    Maybe you could ask Kodak. Their technical section has always been very helpful when I have asked them stuff.
     
  3. mumbleman

    mumbleman TPF Noob!

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    I know it's not a huge help but my dad has found a lot of the slides he shot in his youth (20-30 years ago at least) have faded and turned blue. I don't know what film he was using (i suspect kodak) and obviously film has come a long way since then. I'd be interested in knowing too as I'm just about to go travelling and want to keep those images forever. Post any findings you have here pleaase!
     
  4. Hertz van Rental

    Hertz van Rental TPF Noob!

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    As I have said, a lot depends upon storage conditions.
    Keeping them in archive neg bags or, if mounted, in boxes is the first step.
    Stable temperature and humidity is another.
    If slides have faded and turned blue - this sounds like they have spent some time in bright light, like sunlight. Light fades photo dyes, the magenta going first and then some of the yellow leaving them bluish. C-Type prints do the same.
    E6 tranny should have pretty much the same life expectancy as colour neg if you store it properly.
     

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