emulsion lifts... weeeeeeeeeee!

Discussion in 'Alternative Techniques & Photo Gallery' started by carlita, Oct 30, 2003.

  1. carlita

    carlita TPF Noob!

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    i can't wait to make some of these with slides instead of using my propack camera to take them directly. cause they don't come out that great this way, but for now it's my only option. :? 3 of these are mounted on rice paper, which i found out smells like a wet dog when you soak it. bleh! the other one is mounted on something else and i can't tell you exactly what it is cause i don't actually know. it's highly textured paper though. it was impossible to tear when it was dry and a little too easy to tear when it was wet. these were all shot in shiroh, texas.

    this pretty much looks like a big mess on here. it's easier to make out the image in person :? sorry.
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    [​IMG]

    on this one you can kind of see the strange light blue spots that kept showing up on my pictures. i never did figure out what was causing them.
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    [​IMG]
     
  2. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    I'm soooo jealous....I haven't done anything in weeks and weeks... :cry:

    So, aside from the bad smell, did you like working with the rice paper? It has a nice looking texture....but if it's too much, then I'd be afraid it wouldn't let go of the brayer... I've only used 300# watercolor paper for lifts and transfers, both hot and cold-pressed. Very few problems.

    But I love the look of different papers, and those jagged edges on your first image here look great! Nice job!

    If I had anything negative to say, it would be that I think the clothespin shot works better as an SX manipulation than the lift here...just an opinion. Don't ***** slap me. :wink:
     
  3. ramjamband

    ramjamband TPF Noob!

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    Sorry if I seem a bit thick but what is and how do you do an emulsion lift? :?
     
  4. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    It's a technique mainly accomplished using Polaroid film, usually 669. It's exactly what it sounds like: you "cook" your entire, completely developed Polaroid image in very hot water, gently separating or "lifting" the emulsion from the backing. The emulsion comes off quite easily when following certain steps and is captured in its thin membrane state and planted on the receptor of your choice: Carly and I have used various artist's papers as mentioned above, but you can slap it on glass (ie bottles or glasses or panes), wood or rubber, etc. You can use your fingers or a small artist's brush to further manipulate the emulsion for any desired effect such as stretching or bending your image, or you can leave it alone and just play with the edges. That part is up to you.

    Like learning backgammon, you can pick up the basics very quickly, and then spend countless hours developing technique and strategy for desired effects. Way cool and highly addictive! :D

    I'll see if there's more I haven't posted here for you to look at.
     
  5. Geronimo

    Geronimo TPF Noob!

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    Very nice carli.

    I really like the first and last one.
     
  6. playingwithlight

    playingwithlight TPF Noob!

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    I too am very interested in Emulsion lifting. Does anyone know if this can be done with regular black and white or color film/slides? If so what is the technique and the film tried? Any information would be appreciated. Even if someone has tried it with partial success would encourage me to persue this further.

    Thank you in advance, :wink:

    Have a wonderful day!!!
     
  7. ramjamband

    ramjamband TPF Noob!

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    Thaks for the info I must give it a try sometime.
     
  8. Tara

    Tara TPF Noob!

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    Lovely images!

    I'm working with polaroids at the mo...might give it a go! Sounds like fun! :D
     
  9. markc

    markc TPF Noob!

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    Just make sure that the film is the peel-apart kind. It won't work with a lot of the new films. I tend to be more partial to the image transfers, but that's just a personal taste thing.

    [some more info]
     
  10. Geronimo

    Geronimo TPF Noob!

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    Holy thread revival batman.
     
  11. karissa

    karissa The Untitled

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    Don't get me wrong... I think this is very cool but it looks like something that happened on accident. You know how the figured out you could do this. Some one was probably cooking and dropped the photo in the water.... was called away and when they came back tried to save the picture..... :lol: Really cool though.
     
  12. terri

    terri Administrator Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Karissa, some of the best inventions, techniques and creative possibilities were discovered by accident or people just playing around.... never hurts to study a bit on a subject. Sometimes you become fascinated by its origin. This particular technique came about because of the unique properties of the emulsion formula invented by one of the 20th century's photographic geniuses, Mr. Edwin Land....and he didn't approve of it. :cheer: Who knows? You might find yourself wanting to write a paper about him some day. :wink:
     

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