enlarger

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by robwst7, Oct 11, 2006.

  1. robwst7

    robwst7 TPF Noob!

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    hey guys, im just now getting started and know nothing about developing yet. im wanting to start with b&w 8x10 and was wonbering if a Bogan 22A enlarger will do this for me? have 2 lenses a Voss 1:3.5 75mm lens, lens reads "22 16 11 5.6 4 35" & 22 16 11 8 5.6 4 35 the other is a Voss 50mm f3.5 will this get me started in the enlargement area? thanks
     
  2. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    b&w 8x10 can mean 8" x 10" negatives or an enlargement of a negative to 8" x 10".

    The two lenses you list are suitable for 35mm [50mm fl] and 6x6cm [75mm].

    The Bogan 22A will easily make an 8" x 10" enlargement from a 35mm negative using the 50mm Voss lens.

    You might wish to get a set of variable contrast filters. That way, youneed only a single pack of variable contrast paper to cover a contrast range of 1 to 5.
     
  3. robwst7

    robwst7 TPF Noob!

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    thanks alot, sorry to say but im sure i will have many more questions in the future
     
  4. Torus34

    Torus34 No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    No problem. Just ask and we'll try to help.

    Sounds like you're gearing up for 35mm [and possibly 120 roll film] b&w. One of the problems you'll face is choosing between all of the different films, film developing chemicals, enlarging papers and print chemicals available. The trick is to pick one and stick with it until you really have it nailed down. Then, and only then, go on to another if you want to experiment. Unless you have a good, solid 'base of operations' to work out from, you will never know what works better [ or worse!]

    Another suggestion is to be sure you know the basics of film exposure. If your exposures are all over the map, you'll have no end of trouble in making decent enlargements.
     
  5. robwst7

    robwst7 TPF Noob!

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    the enlarger does not have a timer. is it a must to have one with it? also what kind of film and paper is pretty good for a reasonable price? thanks
     

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