equipment list - look good?

Discussion in 'Photography Equipment & Products' started by TrueColors, Jun 16, 2010.

  1. TrueColors

    TrueColors TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    Hey everyone-

    I have recently purchased some studio equipment (3 400 watt strobes, softboxes, backdrops, etc., etc. I plan to use this equipment, and the camera and lenses I have now to get familiar with portraiture. I want to own a more professional camera and lenses. I set my budget for around $2,000. How does this list sound?

    Nikon D200 – $600
    Tamron 28-75mm f/2.8 XR Di LD – $375

    Sigma 70-200mm f/2.8 DG HSM II - $800

    Jenis J-ND200-P-B Professional Battery Grip for Nikon D200 – $161

    Thi equipment would be used for event photography and portraits.

    Thanks!
     
  2. D-B-J

    D-B-J Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    9,027
    Likes Received:
    2,171
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    i love my d200, so its a great buy! However, i would get the nikon 35-70 2.8, and the nikon 80-200mm 2.8 AF-S. The 80-200 is around 100, the 35-70 is about 300, and the d200 is around 600.

    That way, you keep all your gear in the nikon family, which is definately be a plus. And honestly, the grip is an unnecessary buy. Do you REALLY need it?
     
  3. TrueColors

    TrueColors TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Apr 23, 2010
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    0
    Location:
    Connecticut
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    I have a grip on my D40 - I acually dont care much that it adds extra weight - I love that I can shoot all night and not worry about the camera dying on me. I also love how it makes the camera feel in my hands - I have such large gorilla hands ;) Another reason I got it for my camera was to help make it more bottom heavy because my camera felt so unstable when strapped around my neck when I had my flash on. Weight and added cost are the only cons I can think of to getting a grip and its outweighed by the pros.
     
  4. KmH

    KmH Helping photographers learn to fish Supporting Member

    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2009
    Messages:
    38,229
    Likes Received:
    5,005
    Location:
    Iowa
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    I know where you can get a sweet, pristine, D200 and a MB-D200 vertical grip (good for events and vertical controls /shutter release for portrait mode).

    Click the link in my siggy ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ ↓ to look it all over.

    Edit......not any more........the D200 has sold, but the vertical grip is still available.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2010
  5. D-B-J

    D-B-J Been spending a lot of time on here!

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2010
    Messages:
    9,027
    Likes Received:
    2,171
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    ^^ its a good deal!
     
  6. djacobox372

    djacobox372 No longer a newbie, moving up!

    Joined:
    May 4, 2008
    Messages:
    2,925
    Likes Received:
    129
    Location:
    Seattle, WA
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos NOT OK to edit
    That's a good list, but the prices aren't bad if the stuff is all new. Used, should be a cheaper. Good used prices would be $500 for the camera, $300 for the tamron, $650 for the sigma, and $75 for the grip.

    That grip sells new on ebay for $100.

    I'm also with the other poster that recommended the nikon 80-200 af-s; they sell for around $1000 in great condition; and will hold their value better then the sigma.

    You may also want to consider a nikon 80-200 AF lens, since you're a studio shooter and the extra speed of af-s may not be needed. They sell for almost half what the af-s lenses go for.
     
  7. Vinny

    Vinny TPF Noob!

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2010
    Messages:
    667
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    New Jersey
    Can others edit my Photos:
    Photos OK to edit
    If you're going to shoot portraits then get a prime lens.

    I personally think zooms are great but you seem to have a specific need, portraits, so you should buy a lens geared for a specific purpose. Once you get the formula down - lighting, distance and whatever you will be using that formula for most if not all of your shots. Buying a 85 to 105 mm telephoto would be the the way to go if you can swing the money for one.
     

Share This Page

Search tags for this page
camera equipment checklist
,
event photography equipment list
,
jenis j-nd200-p-b
,
list of photography equipment
,
photographer equipment checklist
,
photographer equipment list
,
photography equipment checklist
,

photography equipment list

,

photoshoot equipment

,

photoshoot equipment checklist