Everything is so green!

Discussion in 'Just For Fun!' started by Dweller, Feb 18, 2005.

  1. Dweller

    Dweller Inconspicuous Supporter

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    with a nod to Mel Brookes.. ;)

    What happened here? I know its way overexposed but why is the foreground so green? I was on a bridge one night setting up this shot, and some guy came along and started chatting with me.. before I knew it my very long exposure (2+ minutes at f/22) became much longer than I had wanted.

    [​IMG]

    I am curious why its colored like it is... is this recipricocity failure? or does that look different from this.
     
  2. SWFLA1

    SWFLA1 TPF Noob!

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    were you standing under a flourescent light? or phosphorus street light?
     
  3. Dweller

    Dweller Inconspicuous Supporter

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    no there were no lights at all.. at least not in the immediate area.
     
  4. Sergiozal

    Sergiozal TPF Noob!

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    Where is the picture?
     
  5. LEXTC

    LEXTC TPF Noob!

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    pic not found
     
  6. kwyjibo

    kwyjibo TPF Noob!

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    no pic dude
     
  7. mentos_007

    mentos_007 The Freshmaker!

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    I can't see the pic neither
     
  8. Dweller

    Dweller Inconspicuous Supporter

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    Whoops sorry about that.. it should be fixed now :)

    Thanks for looking!
     
  9. 2500kelvin

    2500kelvin TPF Noob!

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    Maybe that guy is an alien with any kind of radiation following him where he goes
     
  10. KizaHood

    KizaHood TPF Noob!

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    I'm familiar with this effect. It tends to appear during making severely overexposed nightshots. Once I've made a nightshoot with Fuji Superia 200, using really long exposure (1.5 minutes at f2!!!). That was a suburb object, with very little light on it, and the pic came out extremely green.

    I'm not sure what causes that. Maybe it has something to do with film's chemistry, where some color layers develop more resistance to long exposures than the others (some side effect of well known "reciprocity failure"). Just my oppinion...

    LOL, this pic reminds me on a movie "5th element":
    -How do you like this?
    -Oh, it's really GREEN :mrgreen:
     
  11. mentos_007

    mentos_007 The Freshmaker!

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    maybe there was a fungus? :) that's why it's so green :p
     
  12. andycarnall

    andycarnall TPF Noob!

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    There's two reasons that I'm aware of that may cause it.

    First is that your eyes/brain are very good at colour correcting - in low light the light may be green, but you know stone is grey and you sub-consiously correct for that.

    Second is that (I don't know all the details) but the recriprocity failure (at long shutter times doubling the time does not double the exposure) in film occurs at different rates for the different colours in the emulsion, i.e. the green sensitive chemicals are responding to the increased exposure more then the red sensitive ones. just occured to me - doesn't fuji use a four colour emulsion to increase green sensitivity anyway? Can't remember for definite, but sure I saw an advert suggesting that some time.
     

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