Exposure question

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by NickD, Jan 15, 2010.

  1. NickD

    NickD TPF Noob!

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    I just finished the first chapter of Understanding Exposure: How to Shoot Great Photographs and Bryan Peterson is talking about the fact that each time you set-up for a shot, you should take 6 exposures and choose the "most creative one".

    Example :

    1/500 : F/4
    1/250 : F/5.6
    1/125 : F/8
    1/60 : F/11
    1/30 : F/16
    1/15 : F/22

    What do you guys think about that ?
     
  2. SLRJoe

    SLRJoe TPF Noob!

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    I often take multiple shots of the same scene, but as I'm not often using the tripod I don't go below 1/125. I therefore often keep 1/125 as the baseline and then work up the shutter speeds, varying the aperture as I go. I also try a number of different ISOs for the same scene when it's low light conditions.
     
  3. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    It's called bracketing and I think it's a great idea, especially when you are trying to learn.

    This was a pretty common practice when shooting film because you couldn't see the results right away...and especially with slide film, because the exposure latitude is rather narrow on slide film.
     
  4. gsgary

    gsgary Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Thats not bracketing, they are all the same exposure but you will get different depth of field
     
  5. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Doh!

    You could call it DOF bracketing...rather than the more typical exposure bracketing. ;)
     
  6. gsgary

    gsgary Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    :thumbup:
     
  7. Pugs

    Pugs TPF Noob!

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    DoF bracketing, shutter-speed bracketing, exposure-bracketing... Different tools for different jobs.

    DoF bracketing for trying to hit the right depth for the composition.

    Shutter-speed bracketing for moving subjects to hit the right amount of motion-blur or stop-action or both.

    Exposure bracketing to make your HDRs FTW!! :lol::lmao::lol: Or... for making sure that you nail the exposure in uncertain conditions... but that's not as fun...
     
  8. gsgary

    gsgary Been spending a lot of time on here!

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    Does Brian Paterson explain that those settings will give you the same exposure but with different DOF if not this book does not sound as good as people make out because there have been a few questions on here because people don't understand what he is saying
     
  9. ann

    ann No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    perhaps for a beginner it can be a productive exercise. With that said, sometimes unexperience photographers have a diffcult time seeing the differences unless they are extreme.

    try it for yourself and see if it is helpful for you
     
  10. bazooka

    bazooka No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Gary, about a third of the book is about how to choose the aperture, with a strong emphasis on DOF differences.
     
  11. JAFO28

    JAFO28 TPF Noob!

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    His video might help.

     
    Last edited by a moderator: Sep 11, 2014
  12. Derrel

    Derrel Mr. Rain Cloud

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    Sure, why not try different "equivalent exposures" in order to see which one you like best? Especially when you are learning--since the different equivalent exposures will create different effects. The wider-aperture, higher shutter speed photos will show shallower depth of field and more potential to free object motion, while the smaller aperture, slower shutter speed photos will have deeper depth of field and will tend to allow a bit of motion blur to be conveyed on moving subjects.

    On something like a large scenic waterfall, you might not like the 1/500 second at f/4 photo's rendering of moving water, but you might really,really like a shot done at 1/60 second. At a youth soccer game, I can almost guarantee you that a shot made at 1/15 second at f/22 has a good chance of looking like garbage, but a shot done at 1/500 second at f/4 will probably look much better as a stop-action photo.
     

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