Exposure

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Anubis, Dec 11, 2004.

  1. Anubis

    Anubis TPF Noob!

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    Hi Everyone!

    I've been out and about lately doing a lot of (for me) shooting. I went to a local nature reserve (basically a disused dam above a forest).

    I spent time framing my shots, focusing, making sure my tripod was supported to stop the wind shaking it, getting the polariser into the right alignment before using my remote control to fire the shutter.

    I was quite exited to see the results of my hard work... alas the majority came out average with several over/under exposed shots.

    I understand that they were complex, bright sky, dark water, but how can I adjust for this? Should I take a reading from the sky then the bridge (for example) and pick an exposure in betwween? Or just take my reading from the bridge (excluding the sky from the viewfinder while I take the reading)?

    A book I have recommends changing the exposure by +/-2 stops from the camera's suggestion depending on whether or not the majority of the subject in frame is bright or dark. IMHO this doesn't seem like it would work everytime.

    Any advice will be much appreciated!

    Bryan.
     
  2. Scurra

    Scurra TPF Noob!

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    I would say when in doubt bracket your exposures... most cameras will allow you to do it easily and it solves the problem of the one photo you really wanted to come out well being a bit iffy.
     
  3. Anubis

    Anubis TPF Noob!

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    Cheers Scurra!

    Yeah, my camera can do bracketing. I've used it in the past for the shots that I really wasn't sure about, usually trying to take longer exposures of waterfalls. :)

    But i'd like to understand it a bit better without having to waste 3 shots to get one , usable, final image.

    Bryan
     
  4. Digital Matt

    Digital Matt alter ego: Analog Matt

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    In landscape scenes with a huge dynamic range, you have to make a sacrifice somewhere. Overexpose the sky in order to get shadow detail in the foreground, or preserve the exposure of the sky and get underexposed foreground. One way to help this is to use a graduated neutral density filter. It sounds like you are shooting film, but since you didn't say, if you are shooting digital, you can shoot an exposure for each, one for sky and one for the foreground, and combine them in post process for a correctly exposed image.
     
  5. Anubis

    Anubis TPF Noob!

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    Yup :) shooting film (for the moment)

    I'll look into the neutral density filter!

    Can they be used at the same time as my polarising filter? (or any filter for that matter?)

    Cheers,

    Bryan,
     
  6. will965

    will965 TPF Noob!

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    what is bracketing exposures?
     
  7. danalec99

    danalec99 TPF Noob!

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  8. paul rond

    paul rond TPF Noob!

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    Since you are already using a polarizer, put on a second polarizer over it and rotate it. You will notice it will black out your image completely acting as a variable ND filter. Since you are using a TTL meter, you will also maintain an accurate exposure reading and can adjust as you like.
     
  9. Anubis

    Anubis TPF Noob!

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    Thanks for the idea Paul!

    Looking more closely at my photographs from the other day I noticed vinetting on the top right corner, so I'm not sure now whether adding another polariser on top will work out.

    I think I'm going to give the neutral density filter a try, or maybe even invest in a handheld ligh meter.

    Thanks for your resposes,

    Bryan.
     
  10. paul rond

    paul rond TPF Noob!

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    Ah yes, I forgot to mention getting filters large and thin enough so they don't interfear, It can be expensive if not more than just getting NDs, you've got a point there.

    Buying filters oversized, then using a step up ring can cure that problem. I use large filters, 77mm, on my RB67 and step em up for my 62mm ETRS so I can share filters.

    If you are using hand held meters with Polarizers it's a crap shoot at guessing exposures so bracket at least 2 stops.

    Good luck and please post your work so we can see the results?
     
  11. Anubis

    Anubis TPF Noob!

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    This was the first time I noticed vinetting in any of my photographs, so I am begining to wonder if I hadn't fully screwed the polariser into place. I'll make sure to double check it next time.

    Thanks for the info! :)

    You can see some of the photos I took that day here .... http://www.thephotoforum.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=14565

    Bryan.
     

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