Exposure

Discussion in 'Photography Beginners' Forum' started by Trailofdad, Jan 8, 2007.

  1. Trailofdad

    Trailofdad TPF Noob!

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    will bringing the exposure on my canon S3 up create noise or grain like increasing iso speed?
     
  2. fmw

    fmw No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    No, it will cause overexposure - images that are too light. It is good to view what the meter does as a recommendation and not an ironclad rule. Nothing wrong with that. However, too much of good thing can make an image worse.
     
  3. Trailofdad

    Trailofdad TPF Noob!

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    good! so will I be able to increase my shutter speed and use the exposure to compensate for the lighting?
     
  4. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Well...it doesn't quite work like that. There are three things that control exposure. Shutter speed, aperture and sensitivity (ISO). When you change the exposure compensation...the camera is adjusting one or more of those variables for you.

    If you want a higher shutter speed, then the aperture has to get bigger (lower number) but there is a limit to that...once the limit is reached, then the the ISO has to get higher...a higher ISO is what causes noise.

    So when the light is low...you option are to use a longer shutter speed (may call for the need of a tripod) or to turn up the ISO and deal with noise...and even that has a limit. The next option is to add light...like using the flash. However, on camera flash doesn't make for nice lighting...so if that's when you can get creative with your lighting.
     
  5. Trailofdad

    Trailofdad TPF Noob!

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    thanks alot, i guess i will have to up my iso speed. Im shooting a band in a place with very low lighting, and its always hard for me to get good settings for this. Most bands have somthing like a 2 flash rule for their sets.
     
  6. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    Shooting a band in a dark setting...is one of the most challenging things you can do. The usual solution is to use a very high ISO and live with the grain/noise. Unfortunately, cameras with very small sensors, like yours, are very susceptible to noise at higher ISO.
     
  7. Mad_Gnome

    Mad_Gnome TPF Noob!

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    I finally got tired of trying to shoot bands in clubs with a P&S and got a DSLR with a fast lens. I'm typically shooting at f/1.4 to f/2.8, ISO1600 and sometimes I still have to use shutter speeds as low as 1/10. That's when the anti-shake on my Minolta 5D really shines.

    If you're planning on doing a lot of club/band shooting, you'll eventually need to get something with a seriously fast lens. And it's still tough, trust me. Small concert photography is one of the most difficult types of photography you can take up.
     

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