extension tubes or close up 'filters'?

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Camper Dave, Jul 8, 2004.

  1. Camper Dave

    Camper Dave TPF Noob!

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    i'd like to do some close up photography but i can't afford a decnet macro lense at the mo. i've been looking at both the extension tubes and also close up 'filters'. the close up 'filters' are a fraction of the cost of the extension tubes (about £18 as opposed to about £80 for the extension tubes) but has anyone had any experience with them and know if they're any good?

    it's a set of three that screw onto the end of the lense like a filter and they come in +1, +2 & +4 dioptric. anyone know what this means? or am i just being a bit thick today? :oops:

    these are the filters btw;

    http://www.7dayshop.com/catalog/pro...97&PHPSESSID=902ef1fdc3f1ac57c2b662f8a4a08c1b

    thanks for any help peeps :)
     
  2. Rainman

    Rainman TPF Noob!

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    Well, as with many things it's often a matter of compromise. Screw on closeup lenses are never going to be near the optical quality of your prime lens so using them will pretty much always cost a bit of image quality though realistically it my not really be noticable. On the other hand they ARE a lot less expensive than extesion tubes. So closeup lenses do offer an inexpensive way to get started then see if you will be doing enough closeup work to justify spending the bucks for a real macro lens.

    What extension tube are you looking at? I see some at very reasonable prices on eBay. I don't know what brand macro lenses you are looking at, but I'm also seeing some brand name true macro lenses for very affordable prices.
    Regards,
    Raymond
     
  3. matson

    matson TPF Noob!

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    you might want to invest in just a reverse mount (very cheap)....
     
  4. Camper Dave

    Camper Dave TPF Noob!

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    cheers guys,

    i'm looking at a shops own brand extension tube(s) as i can't seem to find any 'brand' ones. i think it's prob best if i invest in some filterts first and see if i actually do much close up work, then upgrade at a later date if i'm using them enough.

    would love a macro lense but monies are just waaaay too tight at the mo (bloomin holidays :oops: ).

    btw, matson, what's a reverse mount?

    cheers,
    dave :)
     
  5. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    A reverse mount is an adapter ring that allows you to mount one lens backward onto another lens. It simply has filter threads on both sides and screws into the front of both lenses. The can be found at camera shops or on E-bay for less than $20.

    I bought one and it works great. In fact it works a little too well. When I reversed a 50mm lens onto a 35-105mm...the magnification was so extreme that I haven't really used it much.
     
  6. BernieSC

    BernieSC TPF Noob!

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    go with extension tubes, close up "filters" are the last thing I would use. they have no field correction which means the center looks fine but your focus vingnets on the edges. Some camera manufacturs do make multi element close up filters which corrects that problem but they are a lot more in cost.
     
  7. photobug

    photobug TPF Noob!

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    Okay, we need to watch terms here. Most places that list a reverse mount adapter ring will sell you a adapter that has the camera mount on one end and male threads that screw into the lens filter threads on the other. One lens, mounted backwards. Looks like this.

    To mount two lenses together you'd use a macro coupler. Ring with male threads on both ends, lenses crew to each end, mount on camera, one lens is mounted backwards .Looks like this.

    Either option is a nice, inexpensive way to get into macro. Ebay is a good place to look. Options abound for <$20 in most cases.
     
  8. Sharkbait

    Sharkbait TPF Noob!

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    I use closeup filters for most of my macro work, and they work fine for what I do. There are limitations, obviously, but they're quite manageable.
     
  9. Camper Dave

    Camper Dave TPF Noob!

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    cheers guys,

    plenty of food for thought there. think i'm gonna have to have a sit down and have a think about this one and what work i'm going to want to do.

    thanks,
    dave :)
     
  10. Mr Fish

    Mr Fish TPF Noob!

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    I am in a fortuneate position to have both Nikon 60mm and 105mm macro lenses but they are sometimes not enough so i also possess a +4 diopter and a set of Kenko extension tubes and an odd assortment of nikon tubes.

    in order of preference is as follows
    1) Macro lens (the Nikons are the dogs doo da's)
    2) Kenko extension tubes
    3) Nikon extension tubes
    4) Diopter lens

    As far as the extension tubes go the Keno's are the only extension tubes that allow for AF (bit of a waste of time in macro work) and allow for camera metering. The Nikon tubes do not allow for metering and require a hand held meter.

    The diopter is ok, but would definately be the weaks link

    The extension tubes mean you can use just about any lens for doing macro. I recently tried using the full set of three kenko tubes and a Nikon 70-200VR with excellent results.

    So i would recommend that you get the extension tubes anyway.
    Also with the tubes there is no glass so there is no drop in optical quality, however they do make the image in the viewfinder darker. (the camera metering compensates for this when taking the shot).
     

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