facing strobes towards each other

Discussion in 'Beyond the Basics' started by Sontizzle, Jun 14, 2008.

  1. Sontizzle

    Sontizzle TPF Noob!

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    will this damage the strobes in any way by facing them towards each other? whether they be 20 feet apart or 1 foot apart
     
  2. andrew99

    andrew99 TPF Noob!

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    No, this is called cross lighting and is a very common technique.
     
  3. JerryPH

    JerryPH No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    In general, becuase of the kinds of results, you don't want them facing each other squarely face to face either. The exception is something like macro photography or small items in a small softbox.

    If your strobes are facing directly into each other, if the subject steps forward even a little, all kinds of things like shadows under the eyes, nose and chin start to appear. Thats why we tend to set them off at 30-45 degree angles. That way the subject has a lot of room for movement without harming the shot.

    And no, it will not harm the strobes at all. :)
     
  4. Sontizzle

    Sontizzle TPF Noob!

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    i was trying out some "Stock" style photos using a lit table top.
     
  5. Jedo_03

    Jedo_03 TPF Noob!

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    Einstein's Theory of Relativity may apply here...
    Although Albie's theories have somewhat been displaced by Quantum Mechanics Theory and Atomic and Particular Physics, it seems that Light still travels at the speed of light and that Light consists of packets of energy known as photons that have distinct wavelengths...
    Now we all know that if a wave particle of a particular amplitude is either accelerated or decelerated by interference, then the original wave particle's state is altered: its amplitude changes (think Newton's Law... if a body is acted upon...)
    So... what is the effect of opposing two flash heads - each emitting packets of photonic energy of given wavelengths (6500k)...
    If we use only ONE flash head - expose for this - say f4 and 125 we can get a reasonable exposure... enough light...
    Now use TWO flash heads... and we need to adjust our exposure DOWN...
    Why is this???
    Both flash heads are emitting light at 6500k each...
    Ahh..!! We see that 2 flash heads emitting light at 6500k amounts to an accumulation of photon energy... We now have 13000k...
    BUT... and here is the crux... At what point do the two sources of light from the flash heads actually meet and combine to summate to 13000k?
    Aha.. Enter The Speed of Light...
    If one flash head source is 20 meters away from the subject - and the other flash head source is 2 meters away from the subject, then the latter will fall on the subject BEFORE the former...
    So... does the camera record the TOTAL photon value (13000k) or just the 'closest' light source value (6500k) or some integer in between...
    And to address the OP point... What... if any... effects occur when photon packets, travelling on collision courses, actually meet and collide?
    Energy meets Energy (photon vs photon): like TRUCK meets TRUCK...
    Valid point...??
    Lingua ora
    Jedo
     
  6. JerryPH

    JerryPH No longer a newbie, moving up!

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    Now I understand why 1 SB-800 at 1/2 power lights up the room and why 2 SB-600s and an SB-800 each at 1/16th light up the whole freaking room to over exposure. :lol: :lol:

    Kidding aside, this is a good example of biggest/strongest is not always needed when you have many smaller ones.
     

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