Fall Copperhead

Discussion in 'General Gallery' started by rdodson, Nov 15, 2004.

  1. rdodson

    rdodson TPF Noob!

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    One of my MANY snake images...

    [​IMG]
     
  2. photogoddess

    photogoddess TPF Noob!

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    Awesome shot. He's scary looking.
     
  3. Harry99

    Harry99 TPF Noob!

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    Good shot. very unusual colour eyes, although I am no expert on snakes.
     
  4. nomav6

    nomav6 TPF Noob!

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    love this picture, do you have any of a copperhead's full body, these are some of my fav. snakes
     
  5. rdodson

    rdodson TPF Noob!

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    The eyes of all the copperheads I have seen match the head of the snake. I use a 105mm macro which allows me to get just a few inches away for good eye shots. Quite pretty.

    If you're intererested in seeing some full shots of coppers you can see them on my reptiles page at, http://www.photoservancy.com/reptiles_and_amphibians.htm

    Thanks everybody for looking and the nice comments.
     
  6. nomav6

    nomav6 TPF Noob!

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  7. Himalayan

    Himalayan TPF Noob!

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    Cool! is it a wile snake, or home keeping snake?
     
  8. rdodson

    rdodson TPF Noob!

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    All my snake images are of wild snakes photographed in the field.

    I have a zoo page on my site, but the vast majority of all my images are of wild animals on location. I always specify if it's a captive animal.

    thanks for looking!
     
  9. Harry99

    Harry99 TPF Noob!

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  10. rdodson

    rdodson TPF Noob!

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    That speckled rattlesnake was a very lucky find.. It's probably the least seen of California rattlesnakes. I only had a couple of days on that trip, so I kind of lucked out finding that snake.

    I hear ya on summer... Herp pics are my favorite to take, they don't make much money but they are still my favorite to work with by far. Can't wait for spring!
     
  11. Big Mike

    Big Mike I am Big, I am Mike Staff Member Supporting Member

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    What is your technique for getting macro shots of wild venomous snakes?

    I would think it would be very hard/dangerous to be that close while trying to get the narrow DOF just right.
     
  12. rdodson

    rdodson TPF Noob!

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    It has it's risks. I get a lot of "dude, you're effing nuts" but honestly it's somewhat safer than it looks. Before I take the extreme closeup pics I take plenty of time to understand the dispostion of that specific reptile and I give it time to calm down and become accustomed to my presence.

    The reality is that biting is the last resort for the reptile, using it's venom is in fact a negitive consequence for the animal. They don't use it lightly.

    But basically it boils down to patience and understanding the snake and it's limits. Really, one can list dozens of little things to do to make it slightly more safe. I have litterally taken thousands of venomous snake images and have yet to get tagged. The closest I've come to taking a hit, I didn't even have my camera in my hand. In all honesty, I expect one day I will be bitten, it just sort of comes with the trade.

    One specific thing to remember when photographing pit vipers, it will not always strike at the lens, but will often aim for the hand. Unlike most snakes that strike at the closest object, pit vipers strike at the warmest object.

    Obviously I love doing this and accept the risks. If this is something you want to get into as well feel free to e-mail me with any other questions.
     

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